Flores for the Immaculate Conception

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This is out on the street in front of the Missionaries of Charity house at Vatican City. The fresh flowers are behind a chained, locked and spiked gate. They are potted, but still have to be watered. Not easy. Or, if done with love, easy enough.

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After all, it’s a gift of Mary to us to give to her Divine Son to give back to her, right?

P.S. Does anyone get the significance of the date below the image of Jesus and Mary?

3 Comments

Filed under Missionaries of Mercy

3 responses to “Flores for the Immaculate Conception

  1. Teresa

    I googled the date and discovered it refers to the March 1, 1944 bombing at the edge of Vatican City.

    From the few English language sources I found there appears to be some debate on who carried out the bombing and how much damage occurred.

    From Wikipedia:
    Monsignor Giulio Barbetta, who recounts his experience of this bombing, says that, while almost all the windows of the Holy Office building were shattered, the glass covering an image of Our Lady between it and the entrance to the Oratory of Saint Peter remained intact and the oratory itself suffered no more than the effects of shrapnel against its wall. This led to the placing of sculptures of two shield-bearing angels to right and left of the image above an inscription that states: AB ANGELIS DEFENSA KAL. MART. A.D. MCMXLIV (Protected by angels, 1 March 1944 AD).

  2. Angela

    I visit the MC Sisters there each time I visit Rome. Such a wonderful order. Being a CoWorker of Bl. Theresa, I love to visit them wherever I go. I got the date on the picture so knew it was to do with the war. Nice to learn all the history.

  3. SognPlaci

    Bombing of 1 March 1944

    There is no obscurity about the identity of the Italian plane that dropped bombs on the edge of Vatican City on 1 March 1944.[clarification needed] It caused human casualties, killing a workman who was in the open and injuring a Dutch Augustinian in the College of Saint Monica. The six low-calibre bombs dropped also caused physical damage to the Palace of the Holy Office, to the Oratory of Saint Peter, and to the Pontifical Urbanian College on the nearby Janiculum Hill. The plane was seen to strike an obstacle, perhaps a tree on the Janiculum, after which it jettisoned its bombs, but crashed after hitting a house on Via del Gelsomino with its wing. The Italian authorities quickly removed the wreckage and the dead pilot.[1][17]

    Monsignor Giulio Barbetta, who recounts his experience of this bombing, says that, while almost all the windows of the Holy Office building were shattered, the glass covering an image of Our Lady between it and the entrance to the Oratory of Saint Peter remained intact and the oratory itself suffered no more than the effects of shrapnel against its wall. This led to the placing of sculptures of two shield-bearing angels to right and left of the image above an inscription that states: AB ANGELIS DEFENSA KAL. MART. A.D. MCMXLIV (Protected by angels, 1 March 1944 AD).[1][18]

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