1998 US Embassy bombings: Nairobi, Dar es Salaam (FBI CIA DARPA)

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embassy dar es salaam

Ten minutes apart in two countries. Numbers killed differ officially, somewhere between 100+ and 303 people. Many thousands wounded. It was catastrophic. Two truck bombs. All other embassies everywhere scared to death. And, of course, this wasn’t only an attack on the United States, but also, very directly, on the peoples and the viability of the countries of Kenya and Tanzania. These bombings were UBL’s first big projects for al-Qaeda.

Two years previously, at the U.S. Embassy in Rome, “Rick” was the guy behind the window who, in express coordination with Main State and without me asking, provided me with a false passport because of a situation with a certain guy who had taken my identity. “Rick” became the FBI’s Chief investigator for U.S. Embassy bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam two years later. “Rick” isn’t sloppy in his work.

When, in late 1998, after these bombings, I went to report something at the Embassy in Rome, I was escorted to a back office upstairs and seated with a certain agent who entirely ignored whatever I had to report, expressly rejecting even being shown what I had brought with me as proof of gun transfers to straw purchases of Mexican cartels as wrought by the guy who stole my identity. But then she proceeded to reprimand me severely for not taking the false passport two years previously. Obviously this was front and center in their minds two years later, even not long after the embassy bombings. She was still incredulous at my stupidity: “Don’t you know who that was who gave you that passport? He became the Chief Investigator for the Embassy bombings. And you didn’t do what he said with what he offered you. Just to let you know,” she continued, “that week we were having a seminar on why never ever to give out a false passport, and in the midst of that, he did, to you. So, what do you think that means? Do you think you should have taken it?”

Rhetorical questions. I was duly smacked down. I just didn’t know what to do two years before, it being that I had only been ordained some four years and couldn’t fathom why I, a citizen in good standing, should disappear from the face of the earth with yet another “identity” in play even while the guy who stole me identity should be protected by the FBI and the State Department. It only more recently dawned on me that he’s working for them. I’m a bit slow on the uptake. This is a perpetual interdepartmental program since 1992 (at least as dated to the letter from the Ambassador at Main State), if not since the late 1970s.

Why mention this again? Because of what happened at Atlanta FBI the other day:

When I told FBI Atlanta that I just wanted to have a chat about some options of the perpetual program I’m on (which the FBI later further entrenched me in), that program going back many decades, they thought I meant something much more recent that popped up when they looked up my name, a program with DARPA. I didn’t know about that one. I have much to say about that, about being game for gaming gamers, assassins. But, I digress. That’s for another post. What I’m concerned about especially is the duty roster at Main State and how that affects the viability of our counterterrorism efforts. Concerns I raised now a year ago are as fresh as if I’d make them today. The DARPA, more recent than all of that, is a distraction. How ironic. Stay tuned for some irony.

7 Comments

Filed under Intelligence Community, Military, Terrorism

7 responses to “1998 US Embassy bombings: Nairobi, Dar es Salaam (FBI CIA DARPA)

  1. Are you implying that the report form you noted in your FBI-Atlanta post originated in DARPA?!

  2. Sheesh. Now why would an agency devoted primarily to the development of technology for military (broadly speaking) application be getting involved in your case? Things get curiouser and curiouser….

  3. elizdelphi

    Something to do with liquid metal fast breeder reactors?

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