Edge of deadly. Still alive. Thanks mom, NIH-Bethesda

Back from the dead. I’m happy about that. I didn’t know that, for me in my own particular circumstances, a simple over the counter cold-remedy is a poison so powerful that it’s almost impossible not to die after ingesting it. I’ve put those cold-remedies in the garbage. I spent from January 1 after the last Mass for Mary, Mother of God, until now, barely moving amidst an allergic reaction so extremely rare that going to an Emergency Room is likely to raise the mortality threat just for sheer exhaustion of sitting in a waiting room until you die without being seen. Mortality rates are already high enough. I lucked out, beating the stats once again. I spend my life being at death’s door. Of course, I realize this is not about luck, but God’s providence for me. And if you’re wondering why I just didn’t pay attention to indications of counter-indications, it’s because the condition is so rare that listing counter-indications doesn’t seem to be a requirement. As the one GTMO guy told me what my “assignment” was – which was getting to know this statement of a particular counterintel spy – “The first thing you have to know about me is that I would never intentionally commit suicide.” Yep. I make that my own. Of course, that has nothing to do with this. Anyway…

Sure, there’s a prophylactic med to take developed a lifetime ago with my own mom as a guinea-pig at the Naval N.I.H., a med that’s really dirt cheap (especially in Europe and the rest of the world) and kind of works – until it doesn’t – but you’re not supposed to take that more than a few months as it causes liver cancer. She hesitated just a bit and died because of that fear. I’ve been taking it for most of my life (with liver cysts to prove it), and have severely put my liver through the ringer. More drugs have been developed more recently. Pretty expensive though. The best is a reactive drug instead of a prophylactic, and, say, at two doses a day in adverse conditions, it would cost more than USA $4,000,000 a year, enough to make an medical insurance company put a hit out so as to avoid payments to pharmaceutical companies. In my case, I’m guessing I could keep it down to no more than $500,000 a year, probably just $286,000. But, that’s still not within the limits of insurance tolerance is it? No. And instead of simply popping a capsule a day (as with the NIH solution), it involves a chemistry set and needles and sterile conditions and the patience of Job with nerves of steel, as you have to only very slowly inject the horror.

A CIA evaluator guy recently asked me what my evaluation of my mom was. Here’s the deal, she was willing to go through all-out-hell as a guinea-pig at NIH literally in deadly conditions, at the edge of death, for weeks at a time, in great pain, for my sake. I remember the phone calls we would get at home from NIH setting up the sessions out East. Just the phone calls were traumatic. The sessions were monstrous. My mom: a martyr of love for me. What do you think I think of her? Thanks, mom. You’re the best. You guys did good, too, at NIH. The head doctor for this talked to me over the phone back in the day, giving advice which has stood me in good stead all these decades. This was able to be set up because, of course, dad was USMC, which is the history of NIH.

3 Comments

Filed under Intelligence Community, Medicine

3 responses to “Edge of deadly. Still alive. Thanks mom, NIH-Bethesda

  1. janine

    Oh goodness Father.. I’m glad you are okay now!! Thank you God for looking after you! you are in my prayers..

  2. Only read this post today, Fr. Byers. So very glad you are okay. You, along with Fr.MacRae are in my daily prayers.

  3. Moms like yours are great! They will go through hell-fire for their kids. I know, I have a mother like that too.

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