Coronavirus quarantine road blocks, checkpoints, thinly veiled threats: part 2

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Update to Part 1 which was about what is happening up in Graham County regarding checkpoints: It was said that people who are resident outside of Graham County will no longer be allowed on Highway 28, then 143, then 129 (or vice versa) when the Nantahala Gorge closure would be opened. Well, now the landslide has been partially cleared and the Gorge is now open again, albeit still with one way traffic regulated by an automatic traffic light and cameras, thus enabling people to entirely bypass Graham County. If you drive up to a Graham County checkpoint and you are not from the county, if you do not have a deed to your property in Graham County in your car with you (literally), you will be turned away forthwith. Yep. Pay attention. For my part, I do have a “Green Card”, it being that I’m the pastor of the Mission Church up in Robbinsville.


Meanwhile for Part 2 down here in Andrews of Cherokee County:

The pictures in the slideshow above were taken the other day. The circumstances of the roadblocks have been changing daily, even hourly. You gotta work in view of contingencies, right? Yes. So, what you see here may or may not be what you see if you are out and about near Andrews. I don’t have overview or any extra special insight regarding these road blocks as I don’t know all the facts, not having oversight. That’s not my purview. That’s for our elected leaders. I may be the Police Chaplain, but that has nothing to do with the barrels and cones.

But I will say this: I’ve been doing a bit of “accompaniment” of some of those present at the road blocks or checkpoints. It’s mighty interesting to see the different reactions of people:

  • Some, say 5%, are a bit perturbed but behave themselves at that moment, entirely polite. Fine. This is smart. Don’t talk yourself into a citation for public disturbance. That’s never a good idea. Never. But there’s always someone… But so far, no one for this as far as I know. :-)
  • By far the vast majority of people, say 90%, are happy go lucky, happy in their own lives and not wanting to make others unhappy. They know they are essential workers and local residents and that there will be no problem at all. All goes very quickly for them and very smoothly. All good.
  • Some, say 5%, hold up any traffic by going out of their way to thank those manning the check points for their service and, if they have been delivering food or gasoline from elsewhere, going back and forth through these check points, they make sure to also add that they wish that the same precautions would be taken in their own home town. They see more mayhem where they are from. And where they are from there are no check points. There may be a lesson there.

The thinly veiled threats have, as far as I know, disappeared entirely just over these few days. The streets and highways are emptying out where we are. People are staying at home as they see the mortality rates go up in surrounding areas. Sometimes it just takes people longer to “get it.” That’s fine.

The next couple of weeks may see plenty of deaths if the charting relative to our stats and that of other countries has any relevance at all. These will be because of infections that took place already some days or weeks ago as we now reap the spread of the virus by the tender snowflakes who feel ever so entitled to spread the virus to others because it’s just an authoritarian rule not to do so.

Of course, I suppose I’m picking on the entitled generation too much. We’re basically all the same in our fallen human frailty. At the railroad block pictured in the slideshow above, when taking that picture, I witnessed an entirely elderly geezer get out of his truck, move the barrels aside, drive through, and then neatly replace the barrels, continuing on his way, I’m sure quick happy to be so clever. What-eeeeh-verrrrrrr!

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Filed under Coronavirus, Law enforcement, Politics

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