Homily: Chair of the Keys, Peter expendable

CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE — IT’S THE SUCCESSOR OF PETER ! ! ! — CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE CLAP APPLAUSE

No. And No. No to all that Promethean Self-Absorbed Neo-Pelagianism. Saint Peter is sick of it.

The homily below began with a critique of the collect for the feast day. That couple of minutes was edited out. That prayer deserves a much more incisive analysis. We get right into the rather animated homily.

HINT: What the Keys of the Kingdom are really all about is NOT whatever Peter might decide, but about what has already been established in the heavens since eternity. If Peter doesn’t comply, he’s done. If he’s going to teach something about faith or morals that is contrary to the truth already established in the heavens (God is the Living Truth), and he does this for the universal Church precisely as the Rock, personally, Peter, or his successor, especially about something controverted, pronouncing that this is in fact revealed in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition, well then, he simply will NOT be able to do this. He will either be incapacitated in his health or in any way, or die for whatever reason. This is why infallibility is what it is. Peter or his successors can do all the stupid things they want as long as they are not doing such idiocies as a teaching on faith and morals to the universal Church pronouncing that such absurdities are revealed in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition.

There are those who say, entirely heretically, that the Pope can fail, but that he will disqualified to be Pope when he does this. No. That would be the definition of what it means to be fail-able, and the revenge that will taken out on him by those disgruntled, who thus give themselves a license to depose him, throw him into exile, or worse, they having made themselves infallible.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is jesus-peter-keys-kingdom-founding-catholic-church.png

One more thing not mentioned: Saint Peter doesn’t have the Keys of the Kingdom in heaven. You will find those with the Pope, Peter’s successor. And don’t think that he hasn’t used them just because he hasn’t used them for an ex-Cathedra statement. The Pope mandates usage of the keys with the successors of the Apostles and the priests to whom faculties are granted for absolving sins rightly confessed by penitent faithful. That’s where you find the Keys being turned for your benefit: in the Confessional.

1 Comment

Filed under Holy See, Pope Francis

One response to “Homily: Chair of the Keys, Peter expendable

  1. Aussie Mum

    This reminds me of something from Church History that I taught a class many years ago. I now forget the name of the Pope in question but he had become the successor of Peter with the help of one or more influential person/s who wanted some part of the Church’s teaching on faith and morals compromised. However, when it came time to do as his supporter/s wanted he could not do it!
    St Peter’s present successor seems somewhat in the same situation. Some of his statements and actions re faith and morals are confusing. Nonetheless, and despite what his supporters (Francisites) want, Pope Francis’ wrong “teachings” have not changed Church teaching because he has not pronounced them ex-cathedra. While such inability is truly comforting having a less than holy Holy Father is not comfortable, and we notice this more because we have experienced holy men as Popes during our lifetime.
    To put it mildly, Pope Francis is a shock! That God has allowed it means that we deserved and needed such a shock. Perhaps we had become lax in our prayers for the Pope and / or the reparation we were repeatedly called from Heaven to make was not happening on the scale it should have been. Seen in this light, the pontificate of Pope Francis may be a blessing in disguise and if we do our part responding to the urgent calls of Our Lord, Our Lady and St Michael in recent times, Pope Francis and we may yet become saints.

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