If USA declares war can we be drafted, conscripted? Yes. Ready?

Men, 18-60 for sure. Women can sign up, but maybe they’ll be drafted too.

When I was a kid I got my draft card at 16 years old. I went that very day. He took my info but said to wait for a call, but everything was changing, that there’s about zero chance I could go, that everyone was immediately being sent back home. The war was over. But we might have one heating up right now.

  • Conscription can be immediate, even today. If you’re a no-show, not bothering because you think you could prove that medically you can’t go, you will be hunted down and you will go to prison, and then you’ll go anyway.
  • Censorship is legal. It’s easier if everything is taken down. That might be a good idea anyway.
  • Depending on artificially created supply crises, watch for there to be rations, not only for those serving, but those at home, just like during WW2.

I’m 62. But this time around I could probably still enlist as an officer, as chaplains do.

If you’re reading this outside the USA, what are the laws where you are?

  • In Switzerland I think there’s a two year tour everyone does.
  • In Israel I think that now the guys do four required years, while the gals do two.
  • Let us know what happens in your country in the comments…

Meanwhile:

  • Are your worldly affairs in order? Banking, debts? Do you have a will?
  • What about if you own a house and you live alone?

Meanwhile:

  • Go to Confession. Get a Rosary if you don’t have one, and use it. Be ready to go to heaven.

Meanwhile, dad:

6 Comments

Filed under Military

6 responses to “If USA declares war can we be drafted, conscripted? Yes. Ready?

  1. Gina Nakagawa

    We need a crisis to bring us to our knees. It is always thus. May God have mercy on us.

  2. Aussie Mum

    To date, Australia has not had compulsory military service except in time of war and even then only in a limited way:
    * Men called up during WWI remained in Australia for home defence and did not see action; only those who freely signed up for the military – the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) – men like my grandfather (he signed up at 16 years of age) were sent overseas to fight.
    * The meaning of “home defence” was extended during WWII to include engagement in neighbouring New Guinea and adjacent islands, the Citizen Military Force fighting with the AIF as Japanese forces advanced toward Australia. Conscripts were sent no further afield though; only the regular military (the AIF, which my father and uncles joined) was available to serve in all theatres of war.
    * Compulsory military training was reactivated during the Korean War (the National Service Scheme) but only the regular military – no conscripts – were sent to fight.
    * Compulsory military service was again reintroduced between 1964-1972, and in 1965 the government enacted new powers allowing national servicemen to serve overseas and therefore in South Vietnam. Conscription was by ballot (like a lottery) held every 6 months for young men turning 20 years of age; hence, although liable, not all 20 year olds registered in the draw were called up.
    Presently, Australia does not have compulsory military service; joining the Australian Defence Force or the Army Reserve is a matter of choice but that can certainly change.

  3. Aussie Mum

    Father Andrzej Draws, rector of the Sanctuary of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Fatima in Krisovychi, Ukraine, is calling for prayers on March 13th by all devotees of Our Lady of Fatima throughout the world for the conversion of Russia.
    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/250639/ukraine-war-our-lady-of-fatima-shrines-worldwide-asked-to-join-in-prayer-for-conversion-of-russia

  4. sanfelipe007

    A little trivia (take with a grain of salt):https://mathworld.wolfram.com/Triskaidekaphobia.html
    [I get a nickel for each visit – ;-)]

    • Aussie Mum

      Goodness! Triskaidekaphobia and paraskevidekatriaphobia – what strange looking words. Just the thing to lighten one’s mood, mine anyway, thank you 007.

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