Category Archives: Eucharist

Coronavirus Communion in the hand. NOT! Experience of Trad Catholic in Rome.

https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/on-the-ground-updates-from-rome-about-the-coronavirus?utm_source=onesignal

Scroll down that link on lifesite and listen till you get to the part about going to Confession. Wow. Very awesome indeed.

Also, a priest friend of many decades in India sent me this link, which is exhaustive commentary on the subject in these Coronavirus times:

Canon Law Made Easy just published a new post named “Can We Be Required to Receive Communion in the Hand, Because of the Virus?” Check it out! You can view the full article here:

https://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2020/03/12/communion-in-the-hand-virus/

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Coronavirus, Communion in the hand, when I was a kid…

As the days go by and the stats on reported cases and deaths bring up a ratio which is consistent in nations which publish health data with accuracy. Sorry, but I don’t trust China. I do trust Italy and these USA.

The mortality rate for reported cases hovers between 4% to 5%. Today for these USA it stands at 4.33%. That is, around midnight between March 9 to 10, there were 26 deaths with 600 cases.

4.33%… What does that mean? It means that as of now, 1 in every 23 people you see on the street will drop dead.

1/23 is a statistic that changes quickly but it hovers around that rate, more or less. But what does it mean in real life?

The one’s who are getting especially sick with this Coronavirus are those who are already health-compromised and stuck with others who are vulnerable. Sorry to profile, but this means geriatric vacations on cruise ships. Do you know anyone elderly that goes on cruises? I know many. Do you see druggies and drug houses every single day? I do, very, very many. All druggies are ultra-super-health-compromised, are frequently visiting drug houses to get drugs and hang out, and are liable already be sharing diseases of all kinds, and – get this – really don’t have much of a conscience about avoiding sharing disease. No really. There are those who, as we know in now many news reports (just as happened with HIV-AIDS), when someone gets such a virus as Coronavirus or AIDS, they purposely go out as predators so as to spread the virus, so as to spread HIV. That’s fallen human nature.


Fr Z has been writing quite a bit about Communion on the hand vs Communion on the tongue in a time of Coronavirus. Here’s his latest: https://wdtprs.com/2020/03/ask-father-what-to-do-when-intransigent-priests-refuse-communion-on-the-tongue/. That’s helpful. Hint: Communion on the tongue is more hygienic, more reverent. The question in that post is about someone who has never received Communion in the hand, is now very elderly, and would be devastated to take Communion in the hand because of an intransigent priest.

I would like to share an analogous event when I was terribly scandalized by a knucklehead priest intent on scandalizing us kids. This is not about sex abuse, but it is quite directly analogous to that as well. This was when I was in second grade attending our parochial school. The Monsignor had our entire class marched over to his rectory, to the little chapel in the rectory. Upon entering I was devastated. I asked what the electric light on the wall was. I was told that this was because the tabernacle was there. Where? I asked. The monsignor pointed to a matchbox sized box unceremoniously stuck to the wall in the corner. I just couldn’t believe it. It was like Jesus wasn’t important, that God wasn’t important. I knelt down. He got real nervous. He had us march around the butcher block altar in the middle of the little room (which also totally scandalized me). I asked if that was really the altar as it wasn’t at all like the high altar over in the church that was then being torn down. Yes, it’s the altar, he said. My heart sank. I was scared. What’s happening? I was extremely aware of the reverence I had for the altar. And he was forcing us to touch it. I asked like three times if I had to touch the altar. He said yes, and was getting quite impatient with me. I was going into full adrenaline mode with everything graying out as I marched around the altar and touched it as did the others. I had hesitated even then at the last second. Just touch it! I was instructed. Sorry to put it this way, but I felt as if I had insulted the Lord, I felt as if I myself has been violated (raped if you will). I was empty. No heart left. My heart had been ripped out of me and stomped on and thrown out. But I did sense – mind you – that the angels had been warning me before this and were angry (so to speak) after this, not angry with me, but with this event, so very, very sad. To be precise, it’s that the very Sacred Mysteries had been stripped from my soul.

Back to Communion in the hand. My anecdote about the altar is an analogy. I would never force anyone to take Communion in the hand. And anyway, Communion on the tongue is more hygienic.

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Communion on the Tongue in a time of Novel Coronavirus panicking: Rock on!

Jesus Passion of the Christ hand nail

An elderly long-time reader of this and now long defunct blogs of mine wrote in all devastation about the brutal treatment she received from an apparently non-believing priest when she approached to receive Holy Communion on the tongue. She gave me permission to share the story for the benefit of all those whose bishops have “mandated” Communion in the hand”:

  • “This morning at daily Mass, the priest shoved the Host in my hand and said ‘In the hand only’.  He has always protested against COTT. I am very shocked. I don’t know what to do. I am an old lady and we never touched the Host because we do not have consecrated hands.  I’m sure the excuse is the coronavirus. So do I stop receiving Holy Communion or is it just my pride getting in the way?”

communion in the hand

My response to this dear soul:

  • “I’m sorry that that happened to you. That’s so terrible. That was actually my experience at my first Holy Communion in the 1960s. Minnesota was sooooo liberal. I would just go to a different parish. Put your hands behind back when you are going to receive and then, hopefully, receive on the tongue. I’ll say a prayer of reparation for that priest.

Some points:

  • You always retain the right to receive Holy Communion on the tongue. Bishops cannot touch universal liturgical law.
  • Receiving on the tongue is a zillion times more hygienic than in the hand. Hands are disgusting. Really. People curl their hands and you cannot avoid touching their hands. Girls put “sparkle lotion” goop all over their hands. Totally inappropriate and sticky and disgusting. Stop it. Blech.
  • Communion in the hand is almost as bad and disgusting as women with tubes of lipstick on their faces and who drink from the chalice leaving glops of disgusting lipstick all over the chalice which then ends up all over the purificators – stopping the administration from the chalice (if that’s what your parish does) until the purificator can be changed out – so, just don’t. We don’t have Communion from the Chalice. I wonder if the priest who insists on Communion on the hand has Communion also from the Chalice. That would be so ironic.

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But is there a theological heresy involved in being worried about the transmission of diseases with Holy Communion being “The Carrior”? Some say that to say this could happen is blasphemous. Not at all.

This is our Lord Jesus. Yes. But think about that for a second. Within hours of the Last Supper He is hanging on the Cross on Calvary and people are spitting on him with whatever rubbish diseases they have. That’s dripping off our Lord and falling on the very ones who are spitting on him. Excuse me, but spitting up when gravity is involved is as stupid as pissing into the wind. You’ll only be subject to what you yourself have done. Of course Holy Communion can be a “Carrior”, not because our Lord is subject to any disease, especially regarding the circumstance of Holy Communion, but because those externals of Holy Communion have nothing to do with Him. As the great Saint Thomas Aquinas said, the externals of the Most Blessed Sacrament are not essential to but rather accidental to the substance of the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of our Lord. The weight and measurement and color and feel and taste and sight… whatever… are accidental. Don’t blame any virus on our Lord Himself, but do blame your lack of care in administering or receiving Holy Communion.

The best video on the Gates of Hell NOT Prevailing and Communion on the Tongue:

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The Sacred Heart of *sotto voce*

When I was teaching in Australia in the seminaries of this diocese or that archdiocese, it was Father PJ who nicknamed me *sotto voce*, referring to the diminished “voice” by which the Roman Canon is pronounced in the “Extraordinary Form” of the Latin Rite. I had assisted a great deal in keeping the Latin Mass Society of Australia alive at the time. And previous to that, I had insisted in a meticulously researched article in the Homiletic and Pastoral Review that however quiet that “voice” is to be, the words are actually and indeed to be exactly pronounced, without which there simply are no consecrations, no Mass. *sotto voce* does not mean saying nothing, being a stone. It means that one would surely hear something indistinguishable in the first pews of a good sized church. In other words, the priest is speaking, just not to the back pew of any sized church. Take the picture above. If you were the priest and you were reciting the words of consecration, and you saw Christ our God there with you such as is depicted, you would continue speaking – as He Himself would bid you to do – but in a voice that was quiet but which He could distinctly and clearly hear, there, right in front of you. Get it? The Apostolic Penitentiary backed me up on this, encouraging any cases be brought to them of priests who don’t speak at all during the consecrations. I’ve seen this. Tight lipped. Nothing. And obstinate. Too bad, that. I know someone right now at the CDF, as it was called, who bullies concelebrants into basically saying nothing, because, he says ever so breathlessly, “It’s the Mass of the Celebrant!” That’s so wrong on so very many levels. Anyway, now that that’s out of my system…

I’ve noticed that I’m going a bit quieter at the time of the consecrations at Holy Mass. This isn’t affectation, something that is happening from the outside, forced. No. It’s been something that’s been happening on its own, as it were, over some time. It’s a spiritual thing. I wonder if other priests have noticed this. And actually, I think it’s that they all notice this, but with myself being such a dullard I’m guessing that I’m the only one who has not been ever so privy to what I’m now going to say and this ever since they were ordained. Better late than never, right?

The Holy Mass is generally addressed to God the Father – Te igitur clementissime Pater… – but, of course, while the narrative of the Mass leading up to the consecrations is addressed to the Father, reciting what Jesus was doing, the consecrations suddenly slip the priest into the first person singular of Christ Jesus Himself so that one is speaking directly to the Apostles at the Last Supper, and similarly directly to the trillions of souls who have ever been, are now, or ever will be at the self-same Holy Sacrifice at the altars of their churches, or offered in war on the tops of jeep-hoods, or in a bunk in Dachau or Auschwitz, or in whatever prison cell: “…given up for you,” and “…poured out for you.” It’s just that I’ve been noticing the Heart, if you will, of the Sacred Heart, as the words are pronounced by such an unworthy subject as myself, but myself nevertheless with Him in these statements of His, He who has so much love for us, and we who are so oblivious to all that which He does for us, and how it is that as He is lifted up on the Cross He draws all to Himself. Christ’s loving us no matter the cost and unto death is – I don’t know how else to say it – it puts one in awe, but even while being bidden by those words in the first person singular to be in total solidarity with the true Speaker, Jesus, one with His love. Of course, we know nothing, and in this world are on the outside, as it were, in perception really of anything. Yet, one’s voice naturally goes quieter. One is before the tremendous and fascinating, before the Great Mysteries. There are rubrics about having one’s voice go quiet. This is a description of what should already be happening. This is the Sacred Heart of *sotto voce*.

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Bleeding Host at my Catholic Parish? Grrr…. [and once again, Grrr…]

This is NOT a bleeding Host. No. Pfft. Imagine the fiasco that would have caused. Here’s a timeline and some important circumstances:

Last Friday, December 6, I personally prepared the chalice for Mass, as always, without exception. I put a celebrant altar bread (a bit larger than those used for the congregation so that it can be seen by the whole church at various part of the Mass) on the paten. A paten is a purpose made small usually gold-plated plate used for some parts of the Mass. I wasn’t paying much attention assembling the chalice, purificator, paten with altar bread, pall, chalice veil, burse with corporal together nicely symmetrically to place on the altar. My bad that I wasn’t paying attention. One should look for defects in the altar bread.

Then it came time for the offertory half way through Mass. That’s when I saw what looked like three reddish smears, like three fingers only slightly wet with a reddish substance that had been smeared across that particular altar bread. That alarmed me, as this would indicate that someone’s whole hand had been soaked in some weird material and that they had purposely smeared their fingers across that altar bread. I mean, it’s so very lightweight, weighing basically nothing, so that a mere touch will move it. Either you pick it up or it moves with you, but you won’t smear it unless you’re holding it purposely in place just for that purpose. Creepy. Brrrr. I immediately took the altar bread back into the makeshift “sacristy” of our tiniest of all parish churches and threw it away in the trash. I was not bleeding at all. I washed my hands anyway. I was creeped out. I got another altar bread from the sealed container in the sacristy fridge (which upon very careful examination, was clean) and brought it out to the altar, put it on the paten, and continued Mass. That was annoying. We get our altar breads through the Poor Clares at the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Alabama, good friends. They get them from a national distributor without any packages being opened. We’ve never had a problem. Don’t be scandalized that I threw that altar bread away. It was not consecrated. And there was no Eucharistic miracle.

Successive Masses over the weekend, December 7-8: no problem.

Monday Noon Mass for the Immaculate Conception: In preparing the chalice once again before Mass there was a difficulty. I opened the container in which we keep the celebrant altar breads in the little sacristy fridge and the top altar bread looked just fine. I tried to grab just the top one in the little container. No go. I fumbled a bit with it, and realized that it was stuck to the one below it. Figuring it was just a bit of humidity that had slightly welded the altar breads together I tried to get them apart, and they did come apart. Being curious, I examined them more closely, both sides each. That’s when I saw the red material pictured on that altar bread above.

It looked like some stage blood. Notice the weird coagulation as the color draws together through what must be an oily substance. That’s not how blood works. Real blood would stain the alter bread and then coagulate. Unless it was real blood, just mixed with something else to make it look, you know, vibrant!, alive!, like some oily substance would. At any rate, it doesn’t soak into the bread, but just stays on top.

Again I checked my fingers to see if I was bleeding, and, indeed, I did have some red on my index finger. What a relief that it was just me bleeding, thought I. And, the blood on my finger had the same shape as that longer stain. Great! But then, upon thoroughly washing my hands there was no cut, no bruise, nothing. What had been on my finger had come from that altar bread, not vice-versa. Grrr…

But maybe it was just some red wine that was on my fingers, surely, after putting some wine in the wine cruet. In writing this, I had to do an experiment, going back up to the church campus and into the sacristy and getting an altar bread and putting a couple of drops on it:

The two drops were immediately soaked up and spread out, disintegrating the altar bread into gloppiness, the opposite reaction from the other. I put some red wine on my fingers. I couldn’t even see it. It’s clear when you put it on your fingers, and flows off, not like my experience with this other substance above. I even tried to get some older wine around the cruet stopper. No, nothing.

Because of the difficulty in staining these two altar breads, which I only noticed once on Friday and then once on Monday, and the way they were stained, I just cannot imagine that this was just a sloppy worker of the company which produces these breads. Zero chance of that. And in that case it would all have been long dried. The three fingers thing is just too weird in the Friday incident. That was purposed, malicious. But why?

Imagine if events had played out differently and there’s a near 100% chance that would have been the case:

What if the bright red stain on the more recent Monday incident were on the lower side of the altar bread so that I just placed it on the paten not noticing anything wrong, seeing only the top side with no stain? What if I had gone through the consecration and lifted it up for all to adore, Jesus Himself, as is said throughout the Gospels and Saint Paul? I wouldn’t see anything, just the clean side of the Host, but everyone else would immediately see what they thought was a “bleeding” Host, and they would all gasp and cry out that the Host is bleeding. Mayhem would ensue. “It’s a Eucharistic miracle! It’s a Eucharistic miracle!”

The fraud would have immediately been brought to light, not only because of the logistics of the stains described above, but because the material is clearly not blood, or at least not blood alone. It had not coagulated but was still sticky for very many days (and who knows how many days or weeks before Friday in that container in the fridge), indicating that it’s probably stage-blood. I would have been accused of grave manipulation. The Church would have been discredited not only in this region, but all around. People would have lost sight of Jesus who truly is present, Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity in the Most Blessed Sacrament, as our Lord Jesus Himself said at the Last Supper united with Calvary: This is my Body now being given up for you… in sacrifice, the Chalice of my Blood now being poured out for you… in sacrifice. What a blow to the Church such stage-blood or whatever it was would be. Stage-blood is so very cynical. Demonic, really.

But God will not be mocked. The angels dislike such shenanigans. It’s so deeply offensive to their Creator and ours. I wouldn’t want to be on the bad side of good angels.

Humanly speaking, I’m sure a Federal Court would agree that such a hate crime blatantly violates the free exercise of religion as guaranteed in the Constitution of these United States. Doing such things can put a perp in prison.

UPDATE: So, I was preparing the chalice and paten for Mass the other day, putting, of course, another celebrant altar bread on the paten. I’ve learned to examine the altar breads rather closely these days, and, again I found another stained altar bread, though it’s probably from the same incident described above. It’s just a small stain, with the same red, in the lower left near the center of the altar bread pictured below (the smallness of the stain being why I missed it in my examination of all the altar breads after the incident described above):

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My comment on this is the same as further above: Grrr

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Thanksgiving. How very Catholic!

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What’s that circling about the church? More on my best memory of dad.

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Dad was all about USMC Fighter-Attack Corsairs and then jets. I once asked him if he could fly helicopters and, to my delight, he said that he could fly about anything at all that any manufacturer has come up with that goes up in the air. Marines. For God and Country. Yes, both of those in the same sentence. For God and Country. A marine is always faithful, semper fidelis, Semper Fi, because God is first of faithful, so to speak, steadfast in the glory of honor: God so loved the world that He sent His only Son… So, I always wax nostalgic… From a post I put up some years ago, with a few more details:

image

Dad’s the one with his back to you immediately to the left of the propeller. This is on the USS Bataan.

My favorite memory of dad was back in the Autumn of 1962, when I was just 2 1/2 years old, ten years after the picture above was taken. I’d walk up in the Communion line next to him with the rest of the family behind us. The first time I had made brave to follow him the rest of the family threw a fit saying that I should be carried, but I insisted I could make the long trek from the back of the Cathedral up to the front, and dad backed me up. The Cathedral had a gorgeous altar rail with the linens flipped over the top. I was always impressed by the linens getting flipped over the top, just as I was with kneeling there beside my dad, reaching up as high as I could to put my hands under the linens like he was doing. I was pretty small. I was filled with such wonder and awe and reverence as the priest and altar boy with paten would make it over to us. They would start on the Epistle side. We were always on the Gospel side. Everything worked together to instill reverence.

It was good be on my knees with dad before the Lord Jesus. Very good. That’s not just reminiscence with commentary of someone older. No. I was thinking that thought as a tiny little kid. And I can still remember thinking it from my diminutive height, especially so small on my knees. I remember how cold the granite altar rail was below the linens – even in summer. Here I am, thought I, with my dad, before God. I was totally enthralled.

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Visitors, Picture, take-away Eucharist

We had something like twenty visitors never seen before by anyone one in the parish at the 11:00 AM Sunday Mass October 13, 2019. We’re a super tiny church, so they stood out. There were two odd occurrences.

During the homily there was a blindingly bright camera flash – like the gunpowder flashes that were used more than a century ago. Not a flash you can can simply ignore. It stopped everything, including me for a good five seconds, as my eyes were unexpectedly dazzled. I don’t know what that was about (for good or evil) but everyone in church instantly fully turned to see what this disturbance was all about. We will see. I don’t like this on any level, and it also raises concerns these days, and so is also imprudent: a little distraction on this side of church, a security incident on the other side of the church… that kind of thing.

The other incident was in administering Holy Communion. A Lady presented herself in such an odd manner that it was entirely obvious that she had never received Holy Communion before in her life. I asked her if she was Catholic and she said she was. Perhaps she was baptized Catholic, but I have to say that it seemed to me she was a full-on liar, though she was certainly stately in appearance and staid and polite in manner. She reached out one-handedly to snatch away the Blessed Sacrament. I said no, that she would have to receive right then and there. Accompanying her staring for a couple of seconds into my eyes with an entirely wry, sardonic smile, she said that no, she was not at all going to receive and so instead, she simply walked back to her pew without the Blessed Sacrament. It was as if to say that she had failed THIS time, but that might not at all be the case the next time. Sorry, but I was creeped out altogether.

Maybe she just wanted to bring Communion to a dying relative who requested this, but, I mean, she could tell me that then and there or she could then have come to see me right after Mass. That would have been the dignified, polite thing to do, right? In either case I would have said that I myself would go to see that person. Perhaps they need the Last Rites, right? That’s how it’s done. That’s what priests are for.

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Where’s the Tabernacle?

Jesus used to be hidden away. We’re happy that He’s back where all the architecture points to Him. More will be done, but this is a good start for the brand new pastor.

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Holy Communion: receiving on the tongue vs grabbing with the hand

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Tiny little feathered friends seen on the Day Off. Very humble, that. Merely receiving. Not grabbing. What does the Lord say to us all in Psalm 81:11?

“Open wide your mouth that I may fill it.”

Also, the Tree of Life, i.e., the Tree of the Living Ones, comes to mind. Adam may receive the fruit of the Tree, the Eucharist from the Cross, but Adam may not reach out his hand and grab the fruit of the Tree, pretending that in that way he will live forever, that is, because he reached out his hand as if he’s saving himself. No. But he may receive if he is receptive.

Adoration this past Sunday at 6:00 AM at Holy Redeemer:

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Eucharistic Miracle: “Dispose of it”

Wasn’t a priest whistle-blower murdered in Buffalo Diocese hours before bringing files to Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò? There seems to be a culture in Buffalo to buffalo. But it’s not that the Buffalo buffalo are striking back as in some sort of “Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.”

No linguistic spoofs here. What does “Dispose of “it”!” mean? Whatever of any miracle – Jesus can do that anytime He wants – it sounds like this was still an intact Host. And then we want to slow waaaay down. Does anyone know any more about this? Was this an intact Host that was “disposed of”?

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9-11 Memorial & Eucharistic Congress

Every year both meet at the same time and place. Law Enforcement and firemen in full gear March up the stairs of the tallest sky scraper in Charlotte. Just an idea, but maybe we could begin the Eucharistic Procession by going up with them.

In the last day in the air and on the road it’s been about 5000 miles. Sooo tired…

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Eucharistic Reparation again!

At the Mission church as well this morning: explicitly Eucharistic reparation.

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Eucharistic Reparation

This morning explicitly for reparation.

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It’s enough to ask: “What the hell is going on? Of what are we so afraid?”

consecration-

I remember putting this picture up a few years ago (I don’t know who so brilliantly created this) and then very quickly after that I think it was a seminarian who tweeted that this picture totally freaked him out, you know, with an attitude of one of those tender snowflakes who are entitled not to be educated about the reality of the way things actually are before God and man. He was really angry. Vindictive. He wanted to stop this in some way, in any way. It shouldn’t be allowed. What the hell was I doing he wondered, ever so bewildered.

In these days I see things that demonically attack the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Disgusting things. It’s enough to ask: “What the hell is going on?” Yep. I agree. There is an answer of course.

  • When’s the last time you heard your priest say that the Last Supper is united to Calvary in the self-sacrificing, totally self-giving wedding vows of Jesus with His Immaculate Bride, the Church, that the priest says in the first person singular: This is my body given for you in sacrifice, the chalice of my blood poured out for you in sacrifice?
  • When’s the last time you heard your priest say that Jesus laid down His life for us, He standing in our place, the innocent for the guilty, so that He would have the right in His own justice to have mercy on us, with mercy being founded, utterly, upon justice.

So, what are the laity supposed to think about the Mass if priests never speak to the reality of the Mass and the Most Blessed Sacrament?

So, what are seminarians supposed to think about the Mass if they have never had any of this presented to them in their training?

We need to stand up to total ignorance and teach the truth and insist that priests teach the truth about the love of God which demands honesty, integrity, goodness and kindness and TRUTH. Anything less leads to utter mayhem and immorality.

We want Jesus! We want to thank Him for laying down His life us, for redeeming us, for forgiving our sins, for bringing us to life. We do NOT want to be confirmed in sin, have rationalizations given to us for sin, or be pushed into sin.

Instruct your priests. Demand that they preach the living Truth of the Son of the Living God.

Be not afraid!

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Always Jesus. Always. No matter what. Yep.

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Consecration at Mass: The irony!

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Father Gordon J MacRae (About) over at These Stone Walls asked me to publish some pictures of day pilgrimages during my Missionary of Mercy trip to Rome in the days surrounding Mercy Sunday 2018. The churches and basilicas involved saints who had been imprisoned, a kind of tradition throughout the centuries.

God’s revelation to us of love and truth and goodness and kindness is also manifested through these members of the Body of Christ, and is a kind of Sacred Tradition if you will, so to speak, as it were. As the great Cardinal Siri pointed out in Gethsemane, the supernatural faith and charity received with sanctifying grace are univocal, always the same, ever ancient, ever new, as they always have the same source in the Holy Spirit.

Christ Jesus was imprisoned. As the Master, so the disciple:

jesus mary solidarity prison

So, we have the tradition of Tradition. We are captives of the Captive One. His love and truth and goodness and kindness is captivating. People push and test His love and truth and goodness and kindness in us, wanting it to be true, but treating us in the same way as our sins treated Mary’s Divine Son. We are, then, captives of Catholic Tradition.

Fr. Gordon MacRae and Pornchai Moontri: Captives of Catholic Tradition

That seems to have gone a little viral with more than 20,000 shares as of this writing. Father Gordon complains: “So, my first post to hit 20k was not even written by me?!!!!” :-) It’s really a very short post. Pretty much all pictures. If you haven’t seen it yet or don’t know Father Gordon or TSW, go over and take a look, especially at Father Gordon’s About Page.

Anyway, Monica Harris dropped a comment on that post saying this:

“The root word of Tradition can also mean betrayal, right? Makes the title of this post true in both senses.”

Sacred Tradition, traditio, or, as the Council of Trent puts it, traditiones – traditions in regard to the articles of faith supernaturally infused into us by the Holy Spirit with Sanctifying grace, refers to a handing on among us of the faith it seems as if by hand (quasi per manus), but really wrought by the Holy Spirit. The Second Vatican Council in its dogmatic decree Dei Verbum, against all definitions of the “spirit of the Council”, repeats what Trent pronounced in Sacrosancta, its first dogmatic decree of the Fourth Session on April 8, 1546.

Judas handed over Jesus to be imprisoned and put to death. Judas, in handing over Jesus, betrayed Jesus. Yes.

In the consecration at Holy Mass, Jesus says:

Hoc est enim corpus meum quod pro vobis tradetur.

For this is my body which will be handed over (given up, betrayed) for you. In the inspired Greek of the Gospels, this is expressed in the present participle: διδόμενον “being handed over now”, thus uniting the Last Supper with Calvary.

The Holy Spirit’s action upon us, flooding us with sanctifying grace, bringing us supernaturally into faith and charity, Sacred Tradition, thus forming us into being the members of the Body of Christ depends on, has its foundation on the obedience of Jesus to the Father, obedience, ob-audire, the eager, prompt listening of Jesus unto death, our redemption. When Jesus lays down His life in this way He also lays down the life of the members of His Body. The most holy moment in the history of the universe, the consecration at the Last Supper, that upon which even Sacred Tradition depends, speaks of Judas’ betrayal of Jesus, indeed, of all the members of the Body of Christ. It is Tradition to be handed over, to be made captive so as to be free. Jesus unites us with Himself in His offering to the Father, handing us over to the Father with Himself.

Good one, Monica.

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My Internet Stalker Guy apparently doesn’t know this about Jesus and me

cardinal burke lourdes

Sacrifice of the Mass I helped to set up as best I could for the soon to be Cardinal Burke when I was a “permanent” chaplain over in Lourdes, France, including being the Traditional Mass Chaplain (for which I suffered really a great deal, not to brag, but just saying how things were and still can be, but that it’s all worth it, of course).

My Internet Stalker guy, who berates me for being young (younger than him!) and having no memories of anything pre-Vatican II (so he thinks), apparently knows nothing about me, or, if he knew it, would hate me all the more for it I’m guessing. He should read these two posts which I published relatively long ago as far as social media goes. And yet I hope that I think he will be inspired by them. Perhaps he will remember good things of his own childhood days and not be so dismissive of Jesus, the Church and priests. Perhaps he will have some hope.

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The gaze of Jesus upon us

The presence of Jesus changes everything.

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Updates: Black Lives Matter blackens Eucharistic Congress of Charlotte

Eucharistic Congress Black Lives Matter CNH

This is an official picture of the Charlotte Diocese’ Catholic News Herald of the banners for the Eucharistic Procession of the Eucharistic Congress we just had on 8-9 September 2017 in Charlotte. You can see the two Black Lives Matter banners behind and to the left and right of the Immaculate Heart of Mary banner on the left of the picture. Here are some close-up shots:

Eucharistic Congress banner black lives matter

Eucharistic Congress banner stand up

The quote — “…and then they came for me...” — is, of course, from Protestant minister Martin Niemöller, the thing about not defending others because they are not oneself until one realizes that oneself is finally among those others and so also needs defending, but now it’s too late. Sounds nice as a critique of our weakness, but it is a principle of anarchy and fascism if it is cut off from reason and justice. Black Lives Matter, as it itself says, will stand up for a cause regardless of its value as long as people with lots of pigmentation are involved. Thus, just a few bits from the official website of Black Lives Matter:

TRANSGENDER AFFIRMING: We are guided by the fact all Black lives [matter], regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status or location

QUEER AFFIRMING: We are committed to fostering a queer-affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking or, rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual unless s/he or they disclose otherwise.

BLACK VILLAGES: We are committed to disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, and especially “our” children to the degree that mothers, parents and children are comfortable.

BLACK FAMILIES: We are committed to making our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We are committed to dismantling the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” that require them to mother in private even as they participate in justice work.

In other words, black lives don’t matter at all to Black Lives Matter, for they don’t respect black people enough to do right by them, tearing them down to the lowest common denominator of bullying ideology and self referential congratulations, attacking the family, attacking the upbringing of kids, attacking the image of God in marriage, making it all about pigmentation and pigmentation alone. Well, with one exception. Black Lives Matter are against all Law Enforcement Officers, including those who are black and, in that case, because they are black. So, we know what this really about.

BLM is a terrorist organization. I specifically disagree with their absolute hatred of our public safety officials and the extreme violence of their movement.

  • “What do we want? Dead cops! When do we want it? Now!”
  • “Pigs in a blanket. Fry em like bacon.”

I could multiply those kinds of videos of this hate group in their own words from all around these USA. This is who they are. This is what they do. Extreme haters.

“But Father George, can’t you open your heart and understand where they are coming from? After all, there are high emotions after a ‘police killing’ when some black man points his gun at police, or when there is black on black violence.”

No. There’s no excuse. And this is not all black people, so many of whom are upset that they are all included by BLM in BLM just because they are black. No. People are people not because of any pigmentation or lack thereof. It’s because they are people. I’m offering Holy Mass today for all the victims of violence among black people, including and especially Justin Carr.

I doubt very much whether these banners were approved by anyone official for the Eucharistic Congress though they are certainly the long advertised banners of the parish specifically promoted on the parish website to be carried in the Eucharistic Procession of the Eucharistic Congress. It’s not that they “snuck in” as some tried to assert. Parishes simply come with their banners and join in the procession. These were their parish banners. The banners did, however, stay put in the main hall throughout the day, until the end. No big deal. But hey! Maybe nobody noticed. At all. All day. But…

As surely expected by those who carried these banners in the procession, the abuse of the Most Blessed Sacrament as a means to legitimize a controversial political ideological movement stirred some emotions among the other participants of the Eucharistic Congress. Such abuse of the Most Blessed Sacrament is, of course, both blasphemy and a sacrilege and is not to be tolerated. I’m wondering if the disgruntlement was actually pre-planned so as to cause a stir on purpose. I saw three police officers rushing to and then standing around the banners as what appeared to be an incident of emotions unfolded just off to the side of the stage where adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament was proceeding in front of ten to twenty thousand people. The police were peaceful and exemplary in keeping good order at that time and during the entire Eucharistic Congress. We thank them for that. I, for one, support the thin blue line. I later thanked the police officer who seemed to be in charge of security.

I should offer the disclaimer that I’m a “white priest” and also Jewish and Pope Francis’ Missionary of Mercy, and I was a participant at the Eucharistic Congress and I feel that the fact of my presence and that of other priests, including black priests, and brown and yellow, was hijacked and speciously used in support of a movement with which I, with which we do not agree.

But, wait a minute, no disclaimer is necessary. I’m a person. Period. That’s why I disagree with Black Lives Matter.

Black Lives Matter is entirely racist and by definition anti-Catholic, by definition an anti-Semitic political movement. Catholic means universal, and Black Lives Matter is specifically not that. It’s all black, everything black and only black, no matter what they otherwise say with the saccharine presentation of the local parish. No room for any universal. No room at all for Jesus. It’s them and only them, alone. BLM is separatist, segregationalist. Like the old South Africa in reverse. To say that the parish means well (and maybe they do ever so incredibly naively) and to add, however, that that makes it all O.K., is as bogus and dishonest as saying that Planned Parenthood loves black people, and therefore it is all OK that Planned Parenthood is also in an all out genocidal war against black people, placing the vast majority of their clinics in poor black neighborhoods with the explicit purpose of getting rid of the black population through attrition. Remember Hitleresque whitey-white Margaret Sanger, their ultra racist founder?

Here’s the deal: Jesus loves all of us. He’s redeemed us all. He wants to save us all. Not one of us is better or worse, more entitled or not. Jesus loves all of us whatever the pigmentation levels in our skin happen to be. I feel personally offended when I see Jesus’ love being abused for the racist reductionism vaunted by Black Lives Matter. I disagree with the discourtesy of that parish for having it seem that I am in solidarity with their terrorist ideology.

Having said that, I have a legitimate question. With that being my opinion, could I ever be transferred to be pastor of that parish in Charlotte? You have to know that I already offered this to the bishop long before I was sent to keep the parish in Andrews open. Would there be loud and unending protests and media coverage? I suppose. That’s O.K. The message the world would hear is Jesus’ goodness and kindness and love and… and… truth. Not such a bad result. It seems one has to start over with many aspects of that parish.

I love challenges, and the one and only real challenge is always to bring people closer to Jesus, whether or not they are closer than I am. Jesus is the One. Not us. It’s all about Jesus. I would go in a heartbeat to help lead this parish closer to Jesus, to go from reductionism to universalism, to go from what is self-referential to that which is consonant with natural law and God’s law of goodness and kindness and… and… truth. And if that crowd supporting the banners wanted to be forgiven in the Confessional for their promotion of the ideological terrorists making up Black Lives Matter, I would of course do just that, with joy. And I tell you this, I love every one there in that parish, including and specifically those who carried the banners. I want them all to get closer to Jesus, to His goodness and kindness and love and… and… truth.

From a Black Lives Matter scene elsewhere:

black lives matter police car

I wonder if the terrorists antifa will be in next year’s procession, along with more explicit promotions of LGBTQ and anti-law-enforcement activities. I suggest that this all be stopped in the bud, and now. I notice that, now days later, the advertisements about the banners are still up on the website at the parish. In fact, an album of pictures of the banners in the procession has been added to the parish website as I write this.

Update: Charlene Duline, whose career in the State Department skyrocketed because of her obvious love and service for all, has, as one might expect with her vast experience in some of the most diplomatically sensitive places on the planet, come up with a solution for us all: Turn Black Lives Matter into All Lives Matter. If the parish were to do that, they would be leaders in the country and the world for a social justice that is truly Christ centered and which is then poised to bring goodness and kindness and… and… truth to all. Thank you dearest Charlene! See her fantastic book on Amazon: HERE.

charlene duline

charlene duline drinking from the saucer

Update: Just to say: I challenge the pastor, who I know – he used to be the pastor of the parish in Brevard in which territory I lived for a number of years – I challenge him and the Black Cultural Commission of his parish to invite me to preach on Mercy at all the weekend Masses of his choice. After all, I am a Missionary of Mercy of Pope Francis, and we are personally bidden by the Holy Father to preach on mercy. It’s a mercy challenge. Can they take it up?

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Charlotte’s Eucharistic Congress & 9/11

Eucharistic Congress with 9-11 memorial

The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks are commemorated every year in Charlotte on the same day we have the Eucharistic Congress (not always September 11), right where the Eucharistic procession begins in front of Saint Peter’s Church before going through the city to the Convention Center for the day. I get to go to both. Great!

Father Mychal Judge

One of the photographers of our Catholic newspaper couldn’t resist taking this picture. The editor said: “Here’s that photo we took — to me, the moment perfectly captures one of the most important aspects of the Congress.” Mercy…

Eucharistic Congress confession

I have to agree about Jesus’ goodness and kindness, of course. Meanwhile, there were lots of great events besides the procession and holy hour, at which a friend, Msgr Schreck, gave a great talk. There were a zillion venders of everything Catholic possible, and vocations booths, and pro-life stuff, and lay movements of all kinds, including the Knights of one kind and another. Here’s the Schreckness with yours truly taking up the last places in the procession before Jesus (photo by a parishioner). Msgr Schreck sponsored me for membership in the CBA:

Eucharistic Congress procession

There were a zillion parish banners which remained on display in the main convention hall after the procession was over. Really nice. This reminded me of all the banners one can see at the Eucharistic and Rosary processions in Lourdes.

Eucharistic Congress banners

I left Andrews about 12:40 AM Saturday to pick up some friends going to the Eucharistic Congress as well, who live out in the middle of absolutely nowhere. We were in time to get some breakfast and go to the Holy Hour before the procession. I got back really very late, and was up again for Holy Hour at 6:00 AM back in the parish, as we have that every Sunday. Then it was non-stop hospital and hospice and Communion calls till evening. It was all totally enjoyable, well, except for one bit, but I’ll save that for another post. The overwhelming aspect of the Eucharistic Congress is Jesus in the Eucharist. It’s all about Jesus.

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