Category Archives: Pope Francis

Update: Packages given to Pope Francis – Most Holy Father: Thank you!

pope francis evangelii gaudium

Package One: Concerning that which goes to the very heart of the McCarrick fiasco the entire dire situation brought to the Holy Father as presented by this package was for himself utterly reversed and put in good order. That’s most stunning in itself, that in which one can rejoice for the good of the priesthood, for the good of the Church. The one involved was burdened with the weight of the universe and that weight has been lifted. But there’s more. The Holy Father caused this to be brought about by those involved with a manner that truly restorative, wrought with a profound ecclesial sense, majestic, really, with apologies, and bringing a sense of the presence of the angels and of our Lord Himself. The blessed Immaculate Virgin was also mentioned. Devout. Pious. Humble. A motive for joy. Thank you, Holy Father, for making this come about. Awesome.

Package Two: This may have instigated an investigation in a most unexpected place with the most unexpected persons. If so, this may have blown out of the water and merely temporarily nixed any more generalized Apostolic Visitation to these United States so as to examine the actions or benign neglect of any bishops across the board. Temporarily.

Apologies: If I was a little bold in putting this before the Holy Father accompanied by a request that was unexpectedly unnecessary – mea culpa – then, in that case of being little too bold, mi pento e mi dolgo con tutto il cuore. However, it might be noticed that the weeks clicked by without me doing anything else whatsoever, just waiting on the Holy Father to do His thing. And he did.

An extra bit in which to rejoice: As some things played out, a particular name of a particular Archbishop, one with whom I am presently involved in certain matters (not a diplomat) came to the fore in a most significant way. Very impressive, very heartening. Awesome.

As I might have said before on this blog, also in regard to the Holy Father:

Nothing is as it seems!

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Conquering today’s demonic abuse of power with hellfire? Yep!

Today’s crisis is all about abuse of power. In our fallen state and without grace we think free will is power over God Himself. We can in fact choose to destroy the image of God: male and female God created them, in the image of God God created them. Male and female was rejected for sex without procreation, making sex about pieces of meat only, so why not same-sex sex? And why not smash down youngsters just when they are able to procreate so as to pervert them into a lust after the power to think one can trounce God by destroying the image of God as male and female? Today’s crisis. It’s about abuse of power. It’s about arrogance challenging God Himself.

People see this abuse of power as hell fire setting people ablaze with demonic machinations of mind games about what is to be bullied into being acceptable and tolerated until it is celebrated. And so it is.

And people fight this often on the same level, lowering themselves to the demonic mind games of bullying, just trying to be louder and more obnoxious. But that gets no one anywhere except perhaps hell. Let’s take a 24 second caricature of a caricature of the burning fires of hell:

As was mentioned on this blog a couple years back, sometimes people think that the fires of hell mean real fire (only), because they are afraid of WHO that fire actually is, namely, God, that is, God’s love. Yes, in hell. It’s not universal salvationistic-esque to say that God loves all regardless of whether or not they love Him, regardless of whether they are in heaven or in hell or here upon this earth for that matter. The difference involves the reception of that love or not:

  • Those in heaven rejoice in this ardent fiery love.
  • Those on earth who follow Jesus are purified by this fiery love.
  • Those in purgatory are purged by this fiery love.
  • Those on earth who reject Jesus are thrown into agonizing frustration by this fiery love.
  • Those in hell, upon whom God’s love shines, scream in the agony that this love brings to them – “IT BURNS!” – for they want nothing to do with such love; their intellectual burning frustration sets their souls on fire. They perceive this love as hatred because that’s what they are all about. They hate themselves, others, God.

Irony is scary, isn’t it? But we are to fight hell fire with hell fire because hell fire is actually the love of God. If we one with God’s love we can see that the scariest thing – hell fire – is not scary at all if we are one with God’s love. That means we can take on the entire onslaught of hell while in our weak state in this world, because it’s not our strength on which we depend: it’s all about Jesus. He’s the One. He’s the only One.

We can and must rejoice in irony, all the more if it is scary, as we know that it is then bearing such magnificence of truth in love.

But maybe I’m “evil”. Hilaire Belloc might say so. Perhaps we should all be so “evil”, just as Jesus was on the cross, bearing as He did the very reflection of the evil from which He was redeeming us, saving us. So majestic. I can’t help but put it up again:

hilaire bellocTo the young, the pure, and the ingenuous, irony must always appear to have a quality of something evil, and so it has, for […] it is a sword to wound. It is so directly the product or reflex of evil that, though it can never be used – nay, can hardly exist – save in the chastisement of evil, yet irony always carries with it some reflections of the bad spirit against which it was directed. […] It suggests most powerfully the evil against which it is directed, and those innocent of evil shun so terrible an instrument. […] The mere truth is vivid with ironical power […] when the mere utterance of a plain truth labouriously concealed by hypocrisy, denied by contemporary falsehood, and forgotten in the moral lethargy of the populace, takes upon itself an ironical quality more powerful than any elaboration of special ironies could have taken in the past. […] No man possessed of irony and using it has lived happily; nor has any man possessing it and using it died without having done great good to his fellows and secured a singular advantage to his own soul. [Hilaire Belloc, “On Irony” (pages 124-127; Penguin books 1325. Selected Essays (2/6), edited by J.B. Morton; Harmondsworth – Baltimore – Mitcham 1958).]

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Pope Francis: Apostolic Constitution changing law for Synods of Bishops

Here’s the document in Italian on the Vatican web site: Episcopalis communio.

I’ve yet to read it over. Maybe on the day-off today.

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Pope Francis and calls for abdication. Are Non-Yes-Men demonic heretics?

pope francis asperges

Those who would attempt to force Pope Francis to abdicate as Bishop of Rome and therefore relinquish the Papacy – say by the act of an ecumenical council (which would not be legitimately called anyway) demonstrate their lack of faith, and perhaps even their being demon possessed. Such a robber council of theirs would, of course, attempt to be polite and nice and claim that they are granting the Holy Father due process, when, instead, the Supreme Pontiff cannot legitimately be subjected to any such process. The process itself would demonstrate the lack of faith of those who put it in place, and who thus grant themselves more authority than the Pope. In short, those who want tribunal style due process for the Pope are heretics. Two things that necessarily go together so that the point can be made:

  • The Pope is not to be submitted to any tribunal style process.
  • He is not to be forcibly removed.

That’s not to say that those who bring charges against the Pope, that is, to him, shouldn’t bring all the proofs of what they say. This can be done with charity. And if they should suggest to the Holy Father that he abdicate, that is not to say that they are lacking in faith or charity. What they do is a far cry from what they do who would plot to force the Successor of Peter from his being the Bishop of Rome. There’s a difference.

If Pope Francis were to ask me what I thought about all of this (That’s not going to happen!), I would say this to him:

“Most Holy Father, distress has come upon the Church and the world because of ambiguous, contradictory, unclear, misleading utterances from you, some of your advisers, from some in the Roman Curia, from some Cardinals and Bishops around the world. Just because a matter of faith and morality is settled dogmatically, and just because you haven’t attempted to use the gift of infallibility to go against matters of faith and morality that have been settled dogmatically doesn’t mean that you have God’s blessing not to confirm your brothers in the faith in an integral, consistent, clear manner, thus rightly leading the Church and the world to Jesus, to the Living Truth who is Charity, our Way, our Life, our joy in the Holy Spirit.”

And then, should he see the point, accept that, repent of all the ambiguity, etc., but feel that he is not up to the task of being clear, of confirming his brothers in the faith, then, in that case, I would suggest to him that he should resign.

That’s the way I see things. I think I can defend that with Saint Thomas’ teaching on fraternal correction. Tell me where I’m wrong. Pretty much everyone is hailing me to be a fringe traditionalist heretic on all this, demonic even. But I don’t see it. Explain why I should be exorcised.

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Ringwraith stabbing: my trip to Rome. Hilaire Belloc “On Irony” ;-)

Image result for ringwraith stabbing

Did you ever see the Lord of the Rings? Do you remember when Frodo Baggins was stabbed by the poisonous sword of the Ringwraith?

frodo ringwraith

It wasn’t those to whom I spoke. It wasn’t those about whom I was speaking. The “Ringwraith” in this case was the political atmosphere storming about Vatican hill. Get near that in any serious way as I did when I went up into the Apostolic Palace the other week to deliver some packages going to the heart of the current crisis and you’ll get stabbed by that Ringwraithness. Again, this doesn’t at all refer to those to whom I spoke or about the packages so delivered.

Getting stabbed doesn’t necessitate becoming a Ringwraith. It just means that you have to struggle a bit. I’m sure we all have an experience like that of Frodo. And we all have “Elvish medicine” by which to conquer.

I’d like to think of that medicine as giving a flower to the Immaculate Conception. After all, she saw her own Son get crushed by Satan and all the powers of hell and saw Him risen from the dead.

To put it another way: When Jesus lays down His life, it is in that very action that He also lays down our lives with His, we being members of the Body of Christ, we being children of Jesus’ good mom, you know, like the Master so the disciple. That’s for all of us.

But that is a burden to carry in this world. I don’t know how those on the straight and narrow in the Vatican can survive. It’s all God’s grace. They carry an enormous burden. They are getting stabbed by Ringwraithness on a continuous basis, 24/7/365. For them: Hail Mary…

But there is more. There is irony. It is so fierce that people can scream running away. Don’t run. Don’t be afraid. Perhaps a re-read of some irony will help:

hilaire bellocTo the young, the pure, and the ingenuous, irony must always appear to have a quality of something evil, and so it has, for […] it is a sword to wound. It is so directly the product or reflex of evil that, though it can never be used – nay, can hardly exist – save in the chastisement of evil, yet irony always carries with it some reflections of the bad spirit against which it was directed. […] It suggests most powerfully the evil against which it is directed, and those innocent of evil shun so terrible an instrument. […] The mere truth is vivid with ironical power […] when the mere utterance of a plain truth labouriously concealed by hypocrisy, denied by contemporary falsehood, and forgotten in the moral lethargy of the populace, takes upon itself an ironical quality more powerful than any elaboration of special ironies could have taken in the past. […] No man possessed of irony and using it has lived happily; nor has any man possessing it and using it died without having done great good to his fellows and secured a singular advantage to his own soul. [Hilaire Belloc, “On Irony” (pages 124-127; Penguin books 1325. Selected Essays (2/6), edited by J.B. Morton; Harmondsworth – Baltimore – Mitcham 1958).]

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Filed under Abuse, Holy See, Irony, Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Francis

Florence and Francis

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The 2:00 AM Monday marked with a black-circled “D” for a Tropical Cyclone having winds of less than 39 miles per hour is right over the parish in Andrews, NC. There is a threat of some flooding, though not at any of our church campuses or the rectory. There is no threat from the wind.

However, the weird thing with lots of rain and even no wind is that trees simply fall down. The root system cannot grab anything steadfast. The mountain cliffs against which the roads are forged are the super weak shale. As the trees fall in their dozens, roads are blocked throughout the mountains, and, of course, power lines are snapped in half.

What’s different about this storm is that FEMA has decided to pre-position crews to either side of Wilmington NC, so that they can get to work right away. I gotta wonder how well that will work, since the flooding is the real problem in south-eastern NC. The waters build up and recede over something like six weeks. For the first couple of weeks, if I remember rightly, the water can be so high that emergency vehicles simply can’t move. Anyway, all our emergency utility crews are moving down to the coast.

Some close friends live in Wilmington, but they have moved away from the worst areas for the next days or weeks, depending. They helped me with some communication logistics so that I could put together a certain dossier, one of the two packages to bring over to the Holy Father the other week. I’m thinking that the two packages I delivered to him backed him into a corner and lit a bit of a fire under him. I don’t mean to put pressure on him. After all I did deliver it to him, not to some newspaper or some blog.

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Popes and anti-Popes

Richard Bonomo sent in a question:

Reading one of your recent blog posts on the the Pope (Kryptic call for assassinating the Pope?) this reminds me of the times I’ve said similar things: if a sitting Pope was on the verge of formally declaring something that is not true, to BE true, God would intervene — one way or the other — to prevent this from happening, including, possibly, killing the man (heart attack, collapsing ceilings, meteor, etc.).

However, the case of a potential anti-pope is different. I am no expert on Church history, but I do seem to recall that there have been times when there were multiple claimants to the See of Peter, and that men of good will were to be found lined up behind all of them, believing the one they supported was in fact the Pope, and the other(s) was(were) not

There is no shortage of people who claim that “Pope Francis” is an anti-Pope, and that either Pope Emeritus Benedict continues to reign as Pope, or the See is vacant. I am fairly sure you have read all of the variations of this, so I will not waste your time summarizing them.

Most of this smells like wishful thinking to me. I assume that “Pope Francis” really is Pope Francis, and that Pope Benedict meant what he wrote in his letter of resignation, and that he is treating his retirement in a manner appropriate to an academic such as himself, retaining some of the trappings of being a professor (Pope) without actually BEING a professor (Pope).

However, I DO find myself wondering if a man accepts an office validly who accepts that office with the intention of sabotage.

If your theory that Pope Francis has been (if I understand correctly) putting on an act with the intention of baiting people with the plan of doing a long-overdue house cleaning once malefactors and the confused are out in the open, then this is, of course, not a concern.

However, what if your theory is wrong?

Well, if Pope Francis is a dupe of a cabal of immoral men who wear the robes of cardinals who seek to take over the Church for their own purposes, or to impose a moral regimen that is not of God, then, assuming the election was otherwise conducted properly, I imagine he would still be Pope, that is assuming that his intentions were, in fact, to fulfill the office as it is supposed to be fulfilled.

On the other hand, if Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio was a willing member of that cabal, and he accepted his election to the papacy for the occult purpose of enacting an agenda which is perverse, then did he accept office validly? Is he Pope Francis, or “Pope Francis” in such a case?
I, for one, do not know how to work this out, nor do I know whom to ask who could give a definitive opinion. Of course, if this last possibility turns out to be true, I really have no idea what I could do, except to pray and be aware.

In any case, our personal holiness, and the sacrificial and sacramental life of the Church must be maintained and not neglected while these matters are sorted out.

============

Answer: Benedict XVI is surely after all this time to be held to be willingly NOT the bishop of Rome, therefore not Pope. That’s why Francis rightly called himself Bishop of Rome. Everyone thought he was demeaning the papacy, but only because they are heretics about the papacy.

Even if one is malicious in accepting the election, it is valid. It’s not ordination. Infallibility is not something positive. It will get you dead right quick if you intend to do something supremely wrong.

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Pope Francis is Colonel Nathan Jessep

“I won’t say a word.”

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Parish and priest friends Status: Jesus is the Priest; He’s the One, the only One.

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For being the tiniest parish in North America, our 6:00 AM Holy Hour of Reparation is doing very well, thank you. Also, Masses these last couple of weeks were very well attended. Also, lots of Confessions! Also, lots of invites for meals and lots of offers of specially prepared treats, like home-made “turtles” (chocolate, caramel, etc.). Moreover, the priests in the area are doubling down on invites to the priests to come to their parish next for a good priest prepared meal for some good priestly fraternity. All good.

Meanwhile, I hear of yet more rubbish even by the hour from across the pond.

Putting those two things together, do you know what this tells me? This tells me that Jesus is the Priest; He’s the One; He’s the only One, and He is very much active in His parishes and in His (arch)dioceses. Vatican City – The Holy See should pay attention.

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IOR Vatican Bank: extortion of a crisis

In this video, Dr Marshall provides a very helpful timeline of events.

What is said in this video is entirely consistent with what was known of the situation. Things have developed of course in the years of Pope Francis’ pontificate. People have taken it upon themselves to manipulate things. This aspect of the crisis is an important key to understanding unintelligible actions from on high.

Extortion is not impossible. Consider that the Holy See and Vatican City State are two entities. If descriptions of the same and laws regarding the same, both internally and internationally, were to be conflated one with the other, what kind of extortion might that permit?

Again, this is a homosexualist crisis. Considering the players behind the scenes, some of whom who have not yet been named, I’m guessing that the idea is to use this as a method of extortion to change the teaching of the Church regarding homosexuality. We have already seen proposed changes. Settlements for “pedophilia” cases, and eventual litigation with much longer tentacles, are merely leverage to push for a change in the teaching of the Church.

Just my opinion. But when you see who is as thick as thieves with who, and with what connections, and the power they have even over the Holy Father, I would say that my opinion is well founded, enough to try to break things open. Oh, I forgot! I’m on my way to Rome today to try to do just that.

 

 

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Murder as suicide: Did Pope Francis get his intervention? So far so good.

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I’ve written previously of this relatively recent incident – a conversation at a meal at a private house with many military officers and others – but I refrained from mentioning the involvement, so to speak, of Pope Francis in that conversation. Perhaps I should be more fulsome in these hectic, confusing, dark times. Here’s more detail about that evening with some of the top of our intelligence community. I think it’s safe to say all this now, two full months later. If it had anything to do with Pope Francis in the first place, whatever was happening with the murder as “suicide” thing is a danger which is surely now passed, I guess, maybe. But one should keep up with situational awareness, including those around Pope Francis. After all, there are those who wish harm upon the Holy Father, who do not hesitate to use extortion. Have we forgotten this scene with Mehmet Ali Agca?

fatima pope john paul assassination

I should emphasize that this was a strange evening. In walking into the house… well… it took like 40 minutes to get beyond the entrance as a discussion on what happens at GTMO was so intense, but I digress. Back to the mid-meal bit about Pope Francis:


Intel officer lady standing up and changing the topic: “Hey Father Byers: Pope Francis… Is his papacy viable? Is he worth it?” [This question about “it”, that is, making an intervention on his behalf, was clearly the point of this encounter with some twenty people, many who are in counterintelligence, counterterrorism and are at the top of their game. Everything went silent at this question and some of the main players were able to catch my eyes while they pointed at her, at her question, nodding their heads so as to say: This is it, the reason for this whole evening: Pay attention to the question. For that moment you could hear a pin drop. One stated the importance of the question to the immediate agreement of the others. The question about Pope Francis being “worth it” refers to… what? Since this crowd was making a big deal out of their knowing about every terrorist plot there is as a preface to this question, what am I supposed to think? It’s only a guess, but it is probable that they were taking seriously one of the many thousands of terrorist murmurings that are always being mumbled round about against the Vatican and the Holy Father, both “chatter” and direct threats. It’s only a guess, but it seems a question was posed higher up as to whether making an intervention on behalf of Pope Francis would be in the interests of these United States. Pope Francis, mind you, states that President Trump is not a Christian. Pope Francis, mind you, can offer Mass on the South side of the border fence. Pope Francis, mind you, doesn’t hesitate for a second to interfere in political / economic controversy. On and on. So, Pope Francis being “worth it” is a question. Indeed, I have to think that even the details of methodology were discovered, as we will see below, the whole murder as “suicide” thing.]

Father Byers to all present (paraphrased, as this part of the evening lasted about an hour): “Always, no matter what, any Pope’s security is worth an intervention. Stopping anything untoward against the leader of 1.3 billion people benefits the common good on so many levels and in so many ways. We believe that the papacy is not just some office, stuff to do, but is founded on the person of the successor of Peter himself. To strike at him is to make an attack on the One who has constituted him as Bishop of Rome. But let me tell you why in particular Pope Francis is ‘worth it.'” [A most intense discussion ensues for about an hour. At about the 45 minute mark, this happened…]

A senior GTMO interrogator knowing just about every terrorist plot and clearly with an ax to grind intel officer to me, shaking his head in rejection of my arguments: “Pffft!”

Father Byers baiting the same Senior GTMO interrogator: “Hey! You would know a best friend of mine who lives not quite around here, but, you know, right in this region. He would get permissions exclusively from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs – not the Chiefs – but only from the Chairman. He’s the one who would deliver detainees from black site to black site all around the world. We’ll call him a logistics guy. You would have met him many times. He would know you well.” [Since this conversation I’ve come to know yet another deliverer of detainees, logistics guy, who has been to GTMO many times. Interesting. It seems I’m getting to know all of them.]

Senior interrogator at GTMO: [He didn’t respond other than with two unmistakable tell-tale body language signs]:

  • Momentary fear in the eyes; he knows he can now be exposed, either as outright verified or as using the GTMO thing as a cover. I do have friends, one being frantic to say it is impossible to verify such things. But that’s irrelevant as, either way, the fear of this guy at the meal reveals the veracity of something serious going down.
  • Simultaneous to the fear in the eyes thing, he suffered a slight, bodily caving-in of the chest, accompanied with a slight shrinking in his chair, just a centimeter back and down, but visible, fearful, not wanting to believe what he just heard, a flight response of fear. He’s knows he’s just been had, totally. I really shouldn’t do this. Perhaps this is my weakness: being an enfant terrible, as the French say. Sometimes it seems it’s just too easy. Maybe it’s made to be too easy. Yet…

Top counterterrorism, counterintelligence guy to me, obviously the senior officer in this discussion but privately, now at the end of the meal and making our way outside the house: “I think you are right about Pope Francis.” [I was giving an impossibly positive spin on Pope Francis’ actions, trying to demonstrate that he’s worth the effort to save with an intervention. I think he repeated some four times in two minutes as we were walking outside and then again outside that he thinks that I’m right about Pope Francis. So then he says:] “I have an assignment for you.” [“assignment” – he’s baiting to find out if I’m the guy who stole my identity decades ago so as to do “assignments,” or if I’m me. Perhaps he knows I can have a chat with the head of security at the Vatican.] “Pay close attention to what Bill Binney [NSA metadata predictor of critical incidents and then whistle blower] says is the first thing to know about himself, that he would never intentionally commit suicide.” [He repeated that, emphasizing, for the sake of my assignment, that he would never intentionally commit suicide. Mind you, Bill Binney had not been mentioned that entire evening. That’s the first time I had ever heard of him. I’m guessing that all this murder as “suicide” thing refers instead to Pope Francis, since, as I say, in the midst of all this, this guy keeps repeating that he thinks I’m right about Pope Francis. I’m connecting the dots here, and I know I’m only guessing, but it seems that there was enough metadata to predict an op over against Pope Francis, one that would involve murder made to look as suicide. How devastating would that be for the Church and the world? The darkness and despair would be hard to imagine.]

chess board robert van der steeg impossible world

To be even more fulsome, I should also include here that other chess pieces also came up in the evening’s conversation, including the demise of Miriam Waldu, the “Front of House” for Pope Francis who was murdered a couple years ago in the midst of the gay-marriage referendum of Italy. She was a shot over the bow. Extortion. Strange that her case was jacked up to a full blown murder investigation almost immediately and then absolutely nothing has been said of her since then. Nothing. As I’ve said previously, I think she was the one the FBI had been bragging to me about, a girl from ultra dirt poor Eritrea snatched up by our intel when it was happenstance noticed that she was the best in the world for instantaneous face recognition, able to recite the relevant biography for any of many thousands of pictures shown to her quickly only once, perfect, then, for “Front of House” for the leader of 1.3 billion people.

Another similar person in the employ of the Holy See came up as well. That guy seemed to have plenty of malice about him, and so I unmasked him. Sorry. I’m the King’s good servant but God’s first. You know the drill. That part of the discussion during the meal was all about his “demise” by way of what I still hold to have been a surely reversible cardiac incident. He was an Italian CIA asset working in the CDF. His identity and intelligence connection was confirmed for me not only by his American trainer – a close CIA friend – but by the head of intel / security at the Vatican).

I can’t imagine what kind of extortion Pope Francis is under, but that’s a story for later.

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Kryptic call for assassinating the Pope?

pope-francis

I’m just going over some drafts I wrote some weeks ago. I thinks it’s time to publish some of them. I think it’s important to emphasize that the most malicious heresy against papal infallibility is the one which has it that the papacy as such is merely an office and is not identified with the very person of the successor of Peter, the Bishop of Rome. To divide the two is to sunder the Holy Father as effectively as any method of assassination could take him out. That’s not to say that everything he says is infallible. It is to say that when he speaks as the Bishop of Rome, the Successor of Peter, to the universal Church, on a matter of faith and morals, especially in deciding a controversy, that is, when he solemnly pronounces on such a matter in such a way with such a quality, and not merely as a dialogue, it is then that his own person is also on the line. Just to be clear:

Jesus spoke of the name of Peter, the Rock, indeed, about himself, personally, upon whom Jesus founds His Church. The papacy is not a mere office, stuff to do, replaceable by a committee, or even a Council without a Pope. It papacy is one with the person of the Pontiff.

The papacy, and the promise of infallibility, has a very direct and immediate effect on the person of Supreme Pontiff himself. If the individual Bishop of Rome, Francis or John or Paul or Benedict by name, whatever, is to fail in infallibility, he is to fail in his own person. Failing with infallibility is not an option (something somehow not understood as self-evident by pundits, lefties and righties alike). The viability of infallibility and the viability of the very person of the Pope have everything to do with each other. Let’s just say it: The Successor of Peter, the Bishop of Rome will die or be utterly incapacitated before he can fail in infallibility. That’s how it works. The physical person of the Successor of Peter is expendable, utterly. Jesus’ guarantee of being with the Church until He returns is at the expense of the Bishop of Rome.

People hate this because they are so soft, so unwilling to admit that Jesus would establish a situation in which, not truth, but one of us is expendable. The identification of the Rock with Peter, of the Keys with Peter’s decision, demands that Peter be incapacitated in whatever manner before he pronounces and declares that which is against the faith and morality, for, as it is, the truth is already and irrevocably established since forever in the heavens. In other words, God will permit or provide such incapacitation or death. No one else is to do this, no gnostic individual, no group of ecclesiastics no matter how exalted they are in their own minds. Tender snowflakes that we are, this absolutely infuriates us and we crucify the Truth by saying that the Pope can change doctrine or, you know, make a mistake which would invalidate his office. This is insipid stupidity.

When people then go the extra step, saying that any one person or any such exalted group could go ahead and eliminate the Supreme Pontiff by a decree declaring him to be an anti-Pope, they insist this can be done if there is a physical, tangible sign, you know, so they can (falsely) claim that they are not gnostics. In that case, the real Pope would be the wrongly declared to be “anti-Pope,” you know, because the gnostic know it alls said so, those who in their own minds are infallible and speak for the Holy Spirit. How ironic. In another time these same people, so right in their own minds, might well have been burned at the stake as heretics. But we are soft today.

Now, what is that sign to be anyway, that someone kills the Pope? That’s about the only thing it could be. Are these pundits calling for the assassination of the Pope, giving some self appointed assassin the divine mandate to act on God’s behalf, providing the sign God surely wants to give? Yes. In my opinion, they are doing just that. Heresy is just that mean, just that ludicrous, just that callous, just that vicious, just that demonic, you know, because of being tender snowflakes who are self-justified in crucifying the disciple like the Master. Read the end of Romans chapter one, say, from verse 1:18 to the end.

I’ll tell you this, Jesus, who established Peter as the Rock, will come to judge the living and the dead and the world by fire. Amen.

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Just after I bought my ticket for Rome: “Fortis fortuna adiuvat.” No! Angels!

DOJ

After my passport numbers went up on line from my favorite travel agency, these hits about my itinerary overseas above were then followed by the same from the FBI’s national research center near Fairmont / Clarksburg WV (CJIS), the largest institution of the agency for centralized info on criminal justice. This is something new, as I’ve learned to expect just a visit from the George Bush Center for Intelligence with a server named so as to be seen. Courteous. I can feel the love! But what changed so as to occasion CJIS?

FBI-Atlanta was kind enough to let me know the other week that I’m involved with the DARPA – COMPASS program. That may have replaced my original decades old perpetual interdepartmental cannot-be-unmasked-for-more-details program of tracking that Main State and later the FBI described to me with a letter and then an alternative identity (effectively a third!) without me asking for it. The COMPASS program carries a certain risk. A target of COMPASS, i.e., a person of interest, can be such because of being at risk or as constituting a risk. Since I’ve always been treated extraordinarily well, I’m guessing I’m in the at risk category, and COMPASS, as DARPA’s new toy, is the now by far the most effective mathematical analysis prediction “machine” (if you will) concerning individuals somehow in the midst of gray zone activities. It’s much easier to just throw me in the mix and forget about it along with the now small multitude of ambiguous characters. That’s what COMPASS is for: easing the burden of work, doing more with less.

In that case, I’m guessing that the tracking promised by Main State in the early 1990s has been delegated to the usual CAPPS systems which continuously updates passenger name records (PNR) for everyone on any given flight manifest. If there’s a high enough risk score attached to that PNR, an inquiry is automatically sent along to the TSA of DHS and, when they are frustrated at being locked out as to why there is a high score, they send the inquiry along. It’s imagined that CJIS can come up with a reason for the high risk score, and, pushing a bit more when that’s found to be untrue, the inquiry is simply overruled by Main State and I’m cleared for the flight, all updating in the COMPASS spreadsheets for use in their surely infallible algorithms. ;-)

So, it’s highly doubtful that there will be a pesky no-fly list notification while, ticket in hand, I attempt to get a gate and confirmed seat assignment at Hartsfield-Jackson international terminal. After all, I’m forever “accompanied”, to use Pope Francis’ terminology, on flights since as long as I can remember, back into the 1980s. I’ve never been on any SSSS or TSDB lists as far as I know, though in 1990 and then again in 2009 some entirely expected fun was to be had at Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion. Smiling chutzpah always wins the day.

The last time I went through the TSA shake down in Atlanta the agents instead stepped waaaay back and let me and my carry-on stuff pass totally unchecked despite plenty of metal in the carry-on stuff and literally many pounds of surgical metal holding my leg together. When I protested their lack of concern about the carry-on stuff and all the metal I had on me they instead said that it didn’t matter, and that I could go through, that I’m good, because their checking me didn’t matter. That just left me bewildered. Less checking than for the pilot, the only other guy in line. It’s not like they were busy…

My seating is always switched out at the last second so as to place me with diplomats (with their usual retinue) or with various branches of the military or with Federal Air Marshals or of other reps of institutes and agencies, always. Or maybe these are the only people who fly these days. One memory in particular regards a most polite and well mannered diplomat who enlisted my help to get safely to the Excelsior in Rome, a kind of beyond the star system hotel next to the U.S. Embassy, reminiscent of the “Continental” of John Wick fame. Goodness!

My usual unusual accompaniment during the flight should be more interesting than the usual interestingness.

Some would wish good luck, good fortune. No. Life has nothing to do with such imagined things as hoped by the creators of the all-power-encompassing COMPASS program, which, ironically, is based entirely on chance, luck, the demon goddess “Fortuna.” What a living hell that is…

Instead, everything has come together seemingly miraculously, in the Providence of our Lord, with the ministrations of the angels, to ensure that what needs to be done is accomplished. But after that, it seems to me, I’ll be quite on my own. But that’s O.K. That’s also according to the will of the Lord. And I’m happy with that.

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Filed under Intelligence Community, Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Francis

Delivering packages to His Holiness

A lady in the parish who raises Czech King Shepherds for law enforcement and other spectacular uses got an interestingly colored but full cross on the back Palestinian donkey the other day and sent me this video of some loud braying. Donkeys are like this. When they bray, it’s very loud indeed.

This donkey, yours truly, is not getting ready to bray. Instead, I am today getting ready to be a beast of burden who will carry the melodies of others across the pond, all the way to somewhere, say, depending, oh, between 125 and 350 meters from the obelisk in front of Saint Peter’s Basilica over in Rome. Strange way to measure distance. Anyway, I’m talking about two packages of whistle blowers, victims of one kind or another.

  • The first necessitates a crossing of international borders this morning just to deliver the package thus far. The legal expertise that has gone into this package is unparalleled for a number of reasons, including an eye witness account of the malice of vicious, ruthless homosexualist politicking from the those in particular positions. This goes to the very heart of what is known thus far, and far beyond. This would be enough for Pope Francis to do what I hope he has been baiting all along and will now proceed to the lopping off of some heads. It’s all way too much, and has been so since the beginning. I’m hoping that his delay has been caused by the unending addition of names being continuously added to the decapitation list. But now, perhaps this very package will convince him that this exercise in baiting has run its course, and that now is the time to act. If not…. just… wow…
  • The second package is enough, all on it’s own, to solidify testimony given by Archbishop Viganò. If this were the only evidence, it would prove Viganò’s case. The best legal mind on the planet (no exaggeration) has his eye on the language used in this particular package. God bless this victim, whose credibility and good standing has been proven by the Pope’s own authorities. :-) This is a case of the suffering of a poor man, who, being the stomped on underdog cast into the darkest of existential peripheries, should catch the notice of Pope Francis, and his compassion, such that, again, he will ascertain that enough is enough, and now is the time to act.

By the way, just to say, none of this has to do with “the children.” It never did. There is much more going on. All the best analysts I know (in the background, but at the heart of things) come to the same conclusion from premises of facts that we have come to know from first hand sources. We can all list a number of interconnected end-of-the-world type extortions being put before Pope Francis. This is why I have always asked your prayers for him. That I am making these deliveries (please God!) is also a result, I am quite sure, of your good prayers.

I recall the last time I tried to do something about this myself. It was the time when I was being tossed quite literally into a dumpster. As I was told, repeatedly, as a reprimand, it was a certain someone in Rome who wanted my demise. I laugh, as I am content with any circumstances in this life. I have my eyes lifted to the heavens. That‘s what’s important. Jesus is the One. Jesus is the only One.

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Filed under Abuse, Donkeys, Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Francis

Eucharistic Reparation again!

At the Mission church as well this morning: explicitly Eucharistic reparation.

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Filed under Adoration, Eucharist, Pope Francis

Eucharistic Reparation

This morning explicitly for reparation.

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Filed under Abuse, Eucharist, Pope Francis

The day this priest was accused of pedophilia: Introibo ad altare Dei. Accused priests, pay attention!

Mass Lourdes Pius X Basilica

Yours truly offering a Solemn High Mass with well over 7000 present in the Underground Basilica of Saint Pius X on 15 August 2008. The deacon and subdeacon are of course, now ordained for the FSSP. The vestments may well have been from Pius IX. The Missal is from yet another FSSP friend. I’m not FSSP, but I was the official[!] “Latin Mass” permanent chaplain in Lourdes since immediately after the famous 7-7-2007 motu proprio of Benedict XVI.

Sometimes we would have Mass in Saint Joseph’s underground church, sometimes on the top floor of the confessional building, sometimes in the top floor of the medical building, sometimes in an under-the-church-chapel of the Basilica of Saint Bernadette, sometimes in either of the two chapels at the front of the upper Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, sometimes in the crypt Chapel, sometimes in the side chapels of the crypt chapel, sometimes in the side chapels of the Rosary Basilica, sometimes in the basement chapel of the Chaplains House, sometimes, finally, in the upper Basilica of the Immaculate Conception over the Grotto.

The accusation came after a most glorious Mass in the upper Basilica of our Lady on a Sunday morning at which there were quite a number of individual pilgrims, groups of pilgrims and, to the point, large families of pilgrims in the pews, you know, with moms and dads and boys and girls kneeling before the Holy Sacrifice. Absolutely beautiful. I was, of course, the luckiest priest in the entire world to have this privilege of bringing the Mass of Tradition, of the ages, back to Lourdes after many decades when it had been banned. The pilgrims loved it. Besides being the “Latin Mass” chaplain I had also been a permanent member of the Italian Language Chaplains Group, and of the English Language Chaplains Group, and of the French Language Chaplains Group. But I digress.

After Mass I made my way back over to the Chaplains House, brought my vestments and Missal and such back to my room on the top floor. I would watch the rivers of pilgrims, by the thousands, coming down the small mountain in back of the Chaplains House, coming off the last stretch of the “Upper Stations.” Finally I went down to the dining room for lunch. It was a perfect summer Sunday. Because of my unique position of having been with so many language groups depending on their needs I could decide at which table to sit. This day there were a few empty places at the English Language Chaplains Group table, so I headed there. You have to know that on any given day there may be present any number of bishops and cardinals and politicians and dignitaries in that dining room.

Present at “my” table was a “Temporary Chaplain” who was single-handedly throughout the decades responsible for the erosion of the prayerful atmosphere at Lourdes, responsible for the destruction of the “Youth Mass”. Needless to say, he hated the Mass of 1962, of the Ages, of Tradition, with great passion. His hatred was always a subject of discussion at table. Not able to forbid the Mass, his plan was to attack me. As soon as he saw me he shouted out for all the dining room guests to hear that I was pedophile. The room, of course, went silent. I asked, “Why do you say that?” He said, thankfully, just as loudly for all to hear, as this was his point in his war against the Traditional Mass:

“I say you are a pedophile because you say that damned Latin Mass and we’ve gone beyond that and you scandalize children who attend that Mass giving them the impression that that Mass is good when it’s not because it’s destroying their character; it’s destroying their ability to look forward, to the future. They’re vulnerable at that age and you’re taking advantage of them by saying that horrible Latin Mass. Pope Benedict should be deposed. Damn him.”

With appropriate stares burning through that “Temporary Chaplain” from all present, the hubbub of the meal immediately picked up again and again it was a beautiful Sunday. I brush that kind of thing off like I brush away a mosquito. It’s annoying for about one second, and then one forgets about it. Whatever. It’s better if you don’t let it draw blood, perhaps infecting you, lowering you to that level.

I remember telling that story in front of a priest who was quite the ecclesiastical climber. He heard the whole story, but all he wanted to hear is that I had “been accused” so that he could smack me down and play the hero. That’s so disgusting. He immediately had me reported to my superior, who, also hearing the entire story, immediately threw me in a dumpster. That was literally the only place in the world I was allowed to exist with a blessing. Yep. They all said that it didn’t sound like a credible accusation, but an accusation is an accusation. That was it. Period. It happens all the time.

Seeing these antics and their anguish and their abuse of office and their climbing up on the corpses of their brothers whom they kill at will, I actually laughed, brightly grinning, even while out of the blue I was threatened with a law suit should I ever repeat how I was being treated. Well, I didn’t use any identifying markers in the story, did I? No. Again, lol, still today. Sorry, but I can’t be hurt. Jesus died for me. So, it’s like… someone else can hurt me in some way? No. That would be laughable. It is laughable. Pfft.

Note to my fellow priests who have been accused, whether you’re innocent or guilty. Our Lord also died for you and brings you His sanctifying grace. And then, after that, ecclesiastical ladder climbing over your corpses doesn’t really matter does it? No. Keep the faith. Or regain the faith. This life is short. Heaven is around the corner, much sooner than later. Remember, it’s all about Jesus. He’s the One. He’s the only One. It’s not about climbers climbing the ladder on mountains of dead priests that they’ve killed. Instead, it’s about Jesus. Only Jesus. He’s the One. He’s the only One.

By the way, I’ve since been able to climb out of the dumpster. And if anyone thinks that a post like this is a scandal about the priesthood and vocations, I say that such a person is utterly ignorant of the way things are. Jesus had his Judas, did He not, telling us also the way things would be should he call someone to the priesthood? Yes. This kind of thing doesn’t put off vocations. It inspires young men to fight the good fight. Why? Because it helps them to understand that it’s about Jesus. He’s the One. He’s the only One.

img_20180821_065037440~2831334697854654523..jpg

By the way, that “Temporary Chaplain” gave me a donkey as a parting gift when I left Lourdes as I had originally planned before I even went there (I had asked for two years to hear the confessions of the millions of pilgrims – one year we had 12 million pilgrims). This was perhaps a year after his fake-news accusation. He still considers and always considered me a friend. He just didn’t like the Traditional Mass and was blaming the Mass for all of society’s ills. Typical. Anyway, here it is, part of my collection. BTW, the “A” stands for donkey in French, as the French name for donkeys begins with “A”. But we all know the meaning in English literature, don’t we? Yes, we do. Whatever. Jesus has also conquered stupidity. BTW, I always ask dying parishioners to tell Jesus that there is a donkey priest down on earth who needs His special help. They say that surely Jesus will respond that all priests are donkeys, so which one in particular was in need of special help? Hahaha. But I think Jesus will know exactly who the donkey priest is.

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Filed under Abuse, Father Byers Autobiography, Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Francis, Priesthood, Vocations

[UPDATE] Pope Francis: Letter to the People of God [Incisive commentary: Bishops lavender mafia escapes again]

pope francis asperges

[See the comments in red which follow below in order to see what a farce this is both in text and at the end.]

Pope Francis has responded to new reports of clerical sexual abuse and the ecclesial cover-up of abuse. In an impassioned letter addressed to the whole People of God, he calls on the Church to be close to victims in solidarity, and to join in acts of prayer and fasting in penance for such “atrocities”.

Letter of His Holiness Pope Francis: To the People of God

“If one member suffers, all suffer together with it” (1 Cor 12:26). These words of Saint Paul forcefully echo in my heart as I acknowledge once more the suffering endured by many minors due to sexual abuse, the abuse of power and the abuse of conscience perpetrated by a significant number of clerics and consecrated persons [What about the bishops?]. Crimes that inflict deep wounds of pain and powerlessness, primarily among the victims, but also in their family members and in the larger community of believers and nonbelievers alike. Looking back to the past, no effort to beg pardon and to seek to repair the harm done will ever be sufficient. Looking ahead to the future, no effort must be spared to create a culture able to prevent such situations from happening, but also to prevent the possibility of their being covered up and perpetuated [What bishops have done and continue to do.]. The pain of the victims and their families is also our pain, and so it is urgent that we once more reaffirm our commitment to ensure the protection of minors and of vulnerable adults. [At least there is mention of minors instead of pedophilia. This was always and almost exclusively a homosexual crisis. This is not admitted here, and I think that such an omission tells us just how lacking in seriousness this all is. There is a mafia-like protection of homosexual bullies. Why is that? Why was this kind of document prepared for Pope Francis to sign. This letter is so cynical, and laughs at the real victims of abuse once again.]

1. If one member suffers…

In recent days, a report [from the Grand Jury in Pennsylvania] was made public which detailed the experiences of at least a thousand survivors, victims of sexual abuse, the abuse of power and of conscience at the hands of priests over a period of approximately seventy years. [So, in other words, even though there is by definition zero due process that happens with a Grand Jury, even though priests were forbidden[!] to defend themselves, even though no trial is possible (thus making this felonious conduct for the judge), ALL priests are held to be guilty based on accusations going back more than a lifetime so that accusations are evidence. In other words, mere accusation is held to be absolute proof of guilt. And huge amounts of money change hands. That’s the definition of abuse of power. So, what’s this all about except to make bishops look like tough heroes. Self-absorbed. Promethean. Neo-Pelagian. Creative of the darkest of existential peripheries.] Even though it can be said that most of these cases belong to the past, nonetheless as time goes on we have come to know the pain of many of the [alleged] victims. We have realized that these [alleged] wounds never disappear and that they require us forcefully to condemn these [alleged] atrocities and join forces in uprooting this culture of death; these [alleged] wounds never go away. The heart-wrenching [alleged] pain of these victims, which cries out to heaven, was long ignored, kept quiet or silenced. But their outcry was more powerful than all the measures meant to silence it, or sought even to resolve it by decisions that increased its gravity by falling into complicity. The Lord heard that cry and once again showed us on which side he stands. [Don’t think our Lord Jesus is unconcerned about a total lack of due process. He Himself was falsely accused. Those who trash due process in hopes of being heroes are not those held to be heroes by Mary Immaculate’s Son Jesus.] Mary’s song is not mistaken and continues quietly to echo throughout history. For the Lord remembers the promise he made to our fathers: “he has scattered the proud in their conceit; he has cast down the mighty from their thrones and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent away empty” (Lk 1:51-53). We feel shame when we realize that our style of life has denied, and continues to deny, the words we recite. [In that case, promote due process. Otherwise this is all hypocrisy, total hypocrisy cynically using the sufferings of real victims to promote instead one’s own heroism for being tough by denying due process.]

With shame and repentance, we acknowledge as an ecclesial community that we were not where we should have been, that we did not act in a timely manner, realizing the magnitude and the gravity of the damage done to so many lives. We showed no care for the little ones; we abandoned them. I make my own the words of the then Cardinal Ratzinger when, during the Way of the Cross composed for Good Friday 2005, he identified with the cry of pain of so many victims and exclaimed:

“How much filth there is in the Church, and even among those who, in the priesthood [and the episcopacy?], ought to belong entirely to [Christ]! How much pride, how much self-complacency! Christ’s betrayal by his disciples, their unworthy reception of his body and blood, is certainly the greatest suffering endured by the Redeemer; it pierces his heart. We can only call to him from the depths of our hearts: Kyrie eleison – Lord, save us! (cf. Mt 8:25)” (Ninth Station).

2. … all suffer together with it

The extent and the gravity of all that has happened requires coming to grips with this reality in a comprehensive and communal way. While it is important and necessary on every journey of conversion to acknowledge the truth of what has happened, in itself this is not enough. Today we are challenged as the People of God to take on the pain of our brothers and sisters wounded in their flesh and in their spirit. If, in the past, the response was one of omission, today we want solidarity, in the deepest and most challenging sense, to become our way of forging present and future history. [I don’t for a second believe it until the past lack of due process for the sake of episcopal self-hero worship is confessed and a promise for due process is made and brought about.] And this in an environment where conflicts, tensions and above all the victims of every type of abuse can encounter an outstretched hand to protect them and rescue them from their pain (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 228). Such solidarity demands that we in turn condemn whatever endangers the integrity of any person. A solidarity that summons us to fight all forms of corruption, especially spiritual corruption. The latter is “a comfortable and self-satisfied form of blindness. Everything then appears acceptable: deception, slander, egotism and other subtle forms of self-centeredness, for ‘even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light’ (2 Cor 11:14)” (Gaudete et Exsultate, 165). Saint Paul’s exhortation to suffer with those who suffer is the best antidote against all our attempts to repeat the words of Cain: “Am I my brother’s keeper?” (Gen 4:9). [And is any of that directed at the bishops? No? Really?]

I am conscious of the effort and work being carried out in various parts of the world to come up with the necessary means to ensure the safety and protection of the integrity of children [this reference to “children” is edging on the pedophilia references around the world which are used to cover up the homosexual crisis. Relatively speaking, there’s no there there for pedophilia. This is about bully homosexuals. NO ONE will admit that. Why is that? I note that the Pennsylvania fake news thing comes on the heals of the McCarrick fiasco, because that referenced homosexuality and no one wants to mention that…] and of vulnerable adults [I’m thinking of a case involving a past chairman of The National Catholic Risk Retention Group, but that’s not mentioned, is it? No. I guess that guy would be friends of certain people in Rome…], as well as implementing zero tolerance [with no due process] and ways of making all those who perpetrate or cover up these crimes accountable [chancery rats? Still no mention of bishops]. We have delayed in applying these actions and sanctions that are so necessary, yet I am confident that they will help to guarantee a greater culture of care in the present and future. [Due process would stop the whole thing in its tracks. It’s true. No one permits due process. Why is that?]

Together with those efforts, every one of the baptized should feel involved in the ecclesial and social change that we so greatly need. This change calls for a personal and communal conversion that makes us see things as the Lord does. For as Saint John Paul II liked to say: “If we have truly started out anew from the contemplation of Christ, we must learn to see him especially in the faces of those with whom he wished to be identified” (Novo Millennio Ineunte, 49). To see things as the Lord does, to be where the Lord wants us to be, to experience a conversion of heart in his presence. To do so, prayer and penance will help. I invite the entire holy faithful People of God to a penitential exercise of prayer and fasting, following the Lord’s command.[1] This can awaken our conscience and arouse our solidarity and commitment to a culture of care that says “never again” to every form of abuse.

It is impossible to think of a conversion of our activity as a Church that does not include the active participation of all the members of God’s People. Indeed, whenever we have tried to replace, or silence, or ignore, or reduce the People of God to small elites, we end up creating communities, projects, theological approaches, spiritualities and structures without roots, without memory, without faces, without bodies and ultimately, without lives.[2] This is clearly seen in a peculiar way of understanding the Church’s authority, one common in many communities where sexual abuse and the abuse of power and conscience have occurred. Such is the case with clericalism, an approach that “not only nullifies the character of Christians, but also tends to diminish and undervalue the baptismal grace that the Holy Spirit has placed in the heart of our people”.[3] Clericalism, whether fostered by priests themselves or by lay persons, leads to an excision in the ecclesial body that supports and helps to perpetuate many of the evils that we are condemning today. To say “no” to abuse is to say an emphatic “no” to all forms of clericalism. [Note how bishops have escaped once again. It’s those priests! As Bill Donohue points out this past two years, the average for abuse by priests is… is… 0.005%. Meanwhile, pretty much all bishops have been in cover-up mode or in no provision of due process mode, a terrible abuse of power.]

It is always helpful to remember that “in salvation history, the Lord saved one people. We are never completely ourselves unless we belong to a people. That is why no one is saved alone, as an isolated individual. Rather, God draws us to himself, taking into account the complex fabric of interpersonal relationships present in the human community. God wanted to enter into the life and history of a people” (Gaudete et Exsultate, 6). Consequently, the only way that we have to respond to this evil that has darkened so many lives is to experience it as a task regarding all of us as the People of God. This awareness of being part of a people and a shared history will enable us to acknowledge our past sins and mistakes with a penitential openness that can allow us to be renewed from within. Without the active participation of all the Church’s members, everything being done to uproot the culture of abuse in our communities will not be successful in generating the necessary dynamics for sound and realistic change. The penitential dimension of fasting and prayer will help us as God’s People to come before the Lord and our wounded brothers and sisters as sinners imploring forgiveness and the grace of shame and conversion. In this way, we will come up with actions that can generate resources attuned to the Gospel. For “whenever we make the effort to return to the source and to recover the original freshness of the Gospel, new avenues arise, new paths of creativity open up, with different forms of expression, more eloquent signs and words with new meaning for today’s world” (Evangelii Gaudium, 11). [Try due process. This isn’t hard. What’s with all these fluffy obfuscations? It’s simple: DUE PROCESS.]

It is essential that we, as a Church, be able to acknowledge and condemn, with sorrow and shame, the atrocities perpetrated by consecrated persons, clerics, and all those entrusted with the mission of watching over and caring for those most vulnerable [“mission of watching over”: like what, the mission of teachers? Bishops escape again.]. Let us beg forgiveness for our own sins and the sins of others. An awareness of sin helps us to acknowledge the errors, the crimes and the wounds caused in the past and allows us, in the present, to be more open and committed along a journey of renewed conversion.

Likewise, penance and prayer will help us to open our eyes and our hearts to other people’s sufferings and to overcome the thirst for power and possessions that are so often the root of those evils. May fasting and prayer open our ears to the hushed pain felt by children, young people and the disabled. [So, there it is, the distinction of children from young people. So this is about perpetuating the fake pedophilia narrative instead of admitting that this is about a homosexual crisis.]. A fasting that can make us hunger and thirst for justice and impel us to walk in the truth, supporting all the judicial measures that may be necessary. [No mention of due process.] A fasting that shakes us up and leads us to be committed in truth and charity with all men and women of good will, and with society in general, to combatting all forms of the abuse of power, sexual abuse and the abuse of conscience. [On abuse of conscience, even innocent priests were sent to treatment centers for mere accusations and had their genitals hooked up to electrical sensors to see what arousal level they would experience with different kinds of porn, including child porn, which is all sinful and in the case of child porn a felony. This was countenanced by bishops and by the Holy See. Priests are given an ultimatum: “Go to the treatment center run by people who have done this to priests, or be dismissed from the clerical state.” Yep. If anyone ever tried to do that to me they wouldn’t live to tell the story. Yes, that is a threat. I don’t countenance rape. And that is what the bishops were doing to their priests all these years. This isn’t about protecting kids. This is all about homosexual sex. Really. I bet it was all filmed, and watched.]

In this way, we can show clearly our calling to be “a sign and instrument of communion with God and of the unity of the entire human race” (Lumen Gentium, 1).

“If one member suffers, all suffer together with it”, said Saint Paul. By an attitude of prayer and penance, we will become attuned as individuals and as a community to this exhortation, so that we may grow in the gift of compassion, in justice, prevention and reparation. Mary chose to stand at the foot of her Son’s cross. She did so unhesitatingly, standing firmly by Jesus’ side. In this way, she reveals the way she lived her entire life. When we experience the desolation caused by these ecclesial wounds, we will do well, with Mary, “to insist more upon prayer”, seeking to grow all the more in love and fidelity to the Church (SAINT IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA, Spiritual Exercises, 319). She, the first of the disciples, teaches all of us as disciples how we are to halt before the sufferings of the innocent, without excuses or cowardice. To look to Mary is to discover the model of a true follower of Christ.

May the Holy Spirit grant us the grace of conversion and the interior anointing needed to express before these crimes of abuse our compunction and our resolve courageously to combat them. [I would be careful about claiming Jesus and Mary and the Holy Spirit as backers when what is said leaves out, say, let me think…. due process.]

FRANCIS
Vatican City, 20 August 2018

=== My own comments follow on what a farce this is. ===

[What follows are my original comments:] I note that priests and religious are pointed out repeatedly, but when it comes to mentioning the bishops, which is what this is all about, we hear only euphemisms such as the mention of “all those entrusted with the mission of watching over and caring for those most vulnerable,” which phrase can also refer to, say, teachers. Sorry, but this whole thing is a smokescreen. It’s BS. Just to say, it’s nice to cite that bit from the famous Stations of Cross of Cardinal Ratzinger (at which I was present), but that also refers to the priests, but to the bishops, not so much.

I also note that there is absolutely zero mention of any due process, which tells me that the self-hero worship of the bishops, their abuse of power, will continue. To date, upon any accusation a settlement is made by the diocese over against any priest to the accuser. There has been no due process. Accusation equals proof to date. That’s all absurd. It’s only about what great heroes the bishops are and continue to be regardless of how unjust they’ve been. This was obviously written by someone like O’Malley and perhaps reps of The National Catholic Risk Retention Group.

Here’s the deal: the abuse of power that can abuse kids is the same abuse of power which can hush things up, which is the same abuse of power which can transfer problems around, which is the same abuse of power which, when found out, can all of a sudden make accusation into proof of guilt, and therefore make immediate settlements without the knowledge of the accused, and which can claim heroism by “taking a hard line,” when all the while what this abuse of power does is simply start the cycle again. How’s that you ask? Glad you asked. Here we go:

When bishops are in full abuse of power, self-congratulatory, “I’m a hero!” mode, will they not do anything to protect, say, a good record, so that, say, in a diocese where no abuse accusation has come about since 2002, and where perception is held to be everything, will not the bishop be tempted to hush things up, to transfer problems, to make accusations into proof, to pay settlements to make due process impossible, to make themselves look like heroes taking a hard line? Yes. Abuse of power of any kind, lack of justice and due process of any kind only promotes more abuse.

This letter written for Pope Francis to sign is already well on it’s way to keep the bishops protected at all costs.

Moreover, the Pennsylvania thing has been utterly debunked. Thus, this letter written for Pope Francis is a last ditch effort to take the spotlight, if you will, off the bishops and but it back on priests. But as Bill Donohue points out, the rate of accusations over the last two years against priests is 0.005%. Compare that to any other public school or group or whatever. There is no comparison. There’s no there there. This is about the bishops, but this letter has skirted that totally, hiding behind Pope Francis. For shame.

 

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Filed under Abuse, Pope Francis

Because we’re the smallest parish

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Larger parishes send in much more, of course. They send it in through their (arch)dioceses. They don’t get letters like this since it’s all done bureaucratically. Monsignor Borgia must have loved sending this letter out. Thanks, Monsignor! Blessings upon you.

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Filed under Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Francis

Catechetical Capital Punishment: Anti-Catholics burn Pope Francis [Update]

wolf angry

The anti-Catholic “katholics” not so kryptically klaim that Pope Francis has “changed church doctrine” in the Catechism of the Catholic Church with a rescript of paragraph 2267 on capital punishment. Those who make the klaim that he changed Church doctrine are well aware that there would be no Catholic Church if doctrine can be changed. They know they scandalize the faithful. They revel in coprophiliac self-congratulating fake-news popularity as heroes, self-proclaimed saviors of the Church and the world.

But, of course, Pope Francis has done nothing even remotely like changing Church doctrine. Not at all. Quite the opposite. He’s reaffirmed it. Let’s do something pretty much no one does. Let’s actually analyse the new paragraphs for 2267 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church with my emphases in bold and [[my comments in red]].

Nuova redazione del n. 2267 del Catechismo della Chiesa Cattolica sulla pena di morte – Rescriptum “ex Audentia SS.mi”, 02.08.2018

The death penalty

2267. Recourse to the death penalty on the part of legitimate authority, following a fair trial, was long considered an appropriate response to the gravity of certain crimes and an acceptable, albeit extreme, means of safeguarding the common good.

Today, however, there is an increasing awareness that the dignity of the person is not lost even after the commission of very serious crimes [[I’m not aware of that truth being lost on those of the past, by the way, but that is beside the point.]]. In addition, a new understanding has emerged of the significance of penal sanctions imposed by the state [[This refers to debate on a deterrent or exacerbating effect of the death penalty.]]. Lastly, more effective systems of detention have been developed [[“been developed”: directly to the point.]], which ensure the due protection of citizens [[“ensure the due protection”: directly to the point.]] but, at the same time, do not definitively deprive the guilty of the possibility of redemption [[This is beside the point as this may also come about because of imminent death.]].

Consequently [[“pertanto” “quapropter”: that is, considering these ever changing conditions, the present conditions, generally speaking – and which can revert back to something more primitive in future – are such that right now, for these particular conditions…]], the Church teaches, in the light of the Gospel, that “the death penalty is inadmissible [[…in present circumstances…]] because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person”,[1] [[“inviolability” … “dignity”: these absolute statements are actually relative to things like “self-defense”, right? So, there’s no there there.]] and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide. [[Fine.]]

[1] Francis, Address to Participants in the Meeting organized by the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, 11 October 2017: L’Osservatore Romano, 13 October 2017, 5. [[This citation is incorrect. It is the last paragraph on page 7 which then continues on page 11. See the PDF of this edition of the Vatican newspaper from the Vatican website:

http://www.osservatoreromano.va/vaticanresources/pdf/ING_2017_041_1310.pdf

Anyway,there are plenty of ambiguous statements in that footnoted private address which is not directed to the universal Church, nor can it be said that everything in that private address to now canonized, as it were, because it is noted for whatever reason, for instance, to let us know more about not so much the doctrine of the Church but as an indication of Pope Francis’ concern, and to show that he has now brought to completion what he had intended to do for quite a while. There’s no there there. That address is NOT the Catechism no matter how much the mere fact of its publication is noted.]]

=======/// In other words, the doctrine stays in place, and this is simply a comment on the proper application of the doctrine in present conditions, generally speaking. Mind you, the prudence of the Church hasn’t changed one bit. This is a faithful rendition of not only of the doctrine but also of the prudent application of the Church from all ages. This is the judgment for the present time, generally speaking.

The method is crystal clear in examining ever changing circumstances. See the words “developed” and “ensure” and “consequently”?

Get it? This is not hard. In fact, it is so easy that one is tempted to think that there is real malice in those who attack to quickly, so easily, with manipulation.

I, for one, think that we need to support Pope Francis with prayer.

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Filed under Death, Law enforcement, Missionaries of Mercy, Pope Francis, Prison