Tag Archives: Fingerprints

Fingerprints DNA Chips and Biometrics: “Who are you, anyway?”

donkey hoof

No one believes the passport. After hours with ID experts of whatever country, the frustrating question to me is always, simply, and only, if politely: “Who are you, anyway?” After some hours, they let me go, exasperated. It’s not that I do bad stuff. They’ll just call me up, demanding that I make an appearance at whatever embassy or consulate. So, how to identify me for sure? It’s a hassle.

Fingerprints

It’s not that my fingerprints are absolutely unusable. I think I have three that are still there in trace form, kinda, perhaps. But according to the most recent scanning, not even that, not really. She predicted they would be rejected by the SBI. Life is what it is and can be pretty rough on fingerprints. Fingerprints can also be lifted, manipulated, transferred.

Deoxyribonucleic acid, also known as DNA

Ever since I was a teenager I’ve been giving DNA cheek swabs. I mean, was I at risk of being confused with someone else (ask I, tongue in cheek). The purpose way back in the day had everything to do with identification and nothing to do with genealogy. But this was always just an American thing as far as I know, and yet, once the signature is established, that can be uploaded in databases easy peasy and a new DNA test would confirm the match on the database. Oh wait! That wouldn’t work either. Hack that database (by way of an insider, because, you know…) and replace your DNA with a guy with a clean record. That’s re-uploaded to databases all around. A check to the database for ID shows nothing untoward and you’re good to go. Then, when your DNA is investigated, it comes up unregistered and it just looks like someone made a mistake. Of course, if you’re re-tested and there is other DNA, like blood, at a scene, you’re done in.

Chips!

Same problem as the DNA switcheroo. “They’re unhackable!” blah blah blah. That makes no difference. You can establish a code’s presence wherever by way of hacking. If you have the code, you can transfer that to your own chip and you’re good to go.

Biometrics…

I’ve got my Gold Star ID Driver License with the picture being taken with, you know, biometrics: twelve points on the head/face all interrelated with each other as far as distances and depths. Great. These are used everywhere for a long time for airport security and what-have-you. This seems to be the answer. Unless, oh, I forgot, for the really desperate cases of ID fraud, go cross eyed for the picture, and otherwise do a bit of nip and tuck and get well placed injections at the conveniently located NCPS adjacent to Liberty Crossing Campus.

Comment:

People are so anxious about who they are. What if it were to be said that Christ is the Head of the Body and we are the members of the Body and that in heaven – please God we make it there – we will rejoice in the good we see in others because that good will be our own good because that good will be God Himself. That kind of disarms all the flutter about ID and such doesn’t it?

People are so weird in this world. They will be quite surprised at just how much God’s ways are above our ways, that love and truth and goodness and kindness and integrity is not the same as political correctness and subterfuge and deceit and conceit and cynicism. God is love and in that love we can rejoice. We find our identity in Him, creatures with their Creator.

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Filed under Intelligence Community, Missionaries of Mercy

Fingerprints and nobody: “Everything about him is wrong.” Spy vs… himself.

I’ve seen almost no movies in my life. I have seen the above clip on YouTube. I applaud the quick-thinking question of The Equalizer: “‘We’ who?” and again “‘We’ who?”

And while the Russian spy playing a detective later states to his partner in crime about Robert McCall – “Everything about him is wrong” – that is the very thing that McCall is thinking about the Russian spy guy: “Everything about him is wrong.”

Here’s the deal: Sometimes there are things people say – or don’t say – that simply cannot be categorized as being “misspoken” or which are simply not intentionally not fulsome.

I’ve met people like this, perhaps more than has been the experience of others, perhaps because of my own weird background and perhaps because I come across as being a simpleton (not that I’m not) and naive (not that I’m not) and so am not worth the effort to try a little more (not that I am).

Some few people I’ve met right around the world have said things that scream, unbeknownst to them, that they were role-playing. Even worse, some few among them didn’t care that they were found out in that role-playing, and simply continued like it was all good.

Perhaps an example is in order. For instance, in one of my far-flung assignments that have taken me right around the world a number of times, I ran across a guy who said that the reason he never had a police check run on himself – virtue signalling guy that he was – was that when he himself was administering police checks on other people he didn’t have available to himself a fingerprint scanner for himself, “you know, one of those gadgety box things” he added. So, even though he could run police checks on others he couldn’t have that done for himself, but, you know, only because they didn’t have a fingerprint scanner gadgety box thing, as if having your prints run and having a police check done on your name are the same things, one dependent on the other. Um. No.

fingerprint scanner

If you didn’t follow the logic of that, don’t feel badly. There are so many things wrong with that assertion that it’s difficult to know where to begin. That’s not the way things are done on so very many levels regarding common sense and policy and – in that particular far flung place – local, state and federal law. And that’s true with just about everything that guy said. It’s like, that was the worst role-playing ever to have been witnessed upon the face of the earth, ever… Ehhh…vur

Just in case it isn’t obvious, let’s draw out a just a few points:

  • You don’t administer your own fingerprint scanning, a conflict of interest thing.
  • You don’t run your own fingerprints, a conflict of interest thing.
  • If you were trained in to do up fingerprints and/or run them, that would mean that you were actually law enforcement, but if that were true, you would have had to have had some kind of serious, thorough law enforcement check, including fingerprints run everywhere with all agencies, and so, in that case, why would you fake it that you never had your prints run and never had a police check?
  • Just because you’re not running fingerprints for anyone doesn’t mean you can’t permit your name to be investigated with a police check.

the doughnut cheltenham

Whether this guy was law enforcement – he did like Doughnuts (see above) – or was faking it, or even faking like it could be legitimately faked, is messed up in any case. Why bother with mind games? That guy claimed to have connections with a certain intel crowd in his country, as if, it seems to me, that would give him a pass, you know, like the virtue-signalling Snowden or the virtue-signalling Strzok, but I think that was just cover for his belonging to another agency between whom, as we say, there is no love lost.

pine gap surveillance australia

Whatever the case, he didn’t get anywhere with anything. What was scary – if anything can be scary – was his utter disregard for coming up with a credible story. He just didn’t care, because, surely, he’ll just bully his way through to a particular occupation and it would all be good. I wasn’t going to let that happen inasmuch as little me could do anything to make sure it didn’t happen. It was all too Camp Swampy:

you know what this is

Of course, nothing is at is seems.

another view

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Filed under Intelligence Community, Law enforcement