Tag Archives: Law enforcement

Flowers for the Immaculate Conception (PSO Medal of Valor, edition)

public safety officer medal of valor

Among those receiving the Medal of Valor two were already no longer living in this world. It’s about doing what you should do. You do it, and it’s almost never recognized. No thanks. In fact, just the opposite. Many condemn you to hell for laying your life on the line… for them. Guaranteed: the contentedness in the face of the young man above isn’t about himself. Instead, this is about seeing things the way they should be, whereby the whole country is recognizing what is right, what is of all honesty and integrity. And that’s good. That’s very good.

I recall some priests from Columbia speaking of all the normal pastoral things that any priest gets into for the sake of his flock, and I stupidly said that they were doing so much. The immediate response of one just ordained priest was one of anger: “No! We’ve done NOTHING! None of us has been killed like so many of our priest-friends in Columbia. We’ve done NOTHING!

public safety officer medal of valor-

Another guarantee: those who have been killed in the line of duty and are standing before the Lord to be judged on what they did in laying down their lives as the greatest act of love will instead stand aside and point to Jesus’ wounds, and then to Jesus’ good mom.

img_20190521_171541~26335185366352001649..jpg

It’s when we realize that even those of us who have laid down their lives as the greatest act of love have done NOTHING. The love, the generosity, the honesty and integrity and humility by which that is done is not our ours, but rather our Lord’s that we’re drawn into. Mary was always in solidarity with Him as He laid down His life for everyone, from Adam until the last man is conceived. Jesus, in doing this, laid down the life of His mother for us as well. He died, and you gotta know, she was totally crushed for us. A flower for you, created by your Son, dearest mother Mary.

Leave a comment

Filed under Flores, Law enforcement, Officer Down!

Spirit of Blue Police Tribute – Paul Harvey – Good Day

Leave a comment

Filed under Law enforcement

It’s the boy at 3’50” Stay in the Fight – Hallelujah LEO Tribute by Chase Curl

We pray to come home to our families when we leave at night.
We pray for comfort, pray for safety, and for peace of mind.
We face the demons in the streets while you all sleep tight.
People meet us with their anger from the 6 O’clock news.
People hurt and people maimed by the boys in blue.
No one looks into the story like they all should do.
No one airs all the officers who save our lives.
They’d rather cover all the issues to increase their dime.
It’s not a story and to them it’s just a waste of time.
Another officer is down.
Do they hear us now?
Another day of being blamed.
While we bear the pain.
We’ll continue to stay in the fight.
In spite of all of this we’ll do what’s right.

1 Comment

Filed under Law enforcement, Officer Down!

Analyzing Strzok’s capacity to lie. The deadpan declaration: “I am America.”

Analysts love declarations. There are certain declarations that are stand-alone, and which simply cannot be voiced unless you mean them in any and all contexts or regardless of any particular context whatsoever. They reveal a helluvalot about a person.

Here’s Peter Strzok declaring away to Tray Gowdy at 5’38″…

“The American electorate I respect in their decisions and their right to vote is absolutely a cornerstone of our democracy so at no time did I insult or call into question the judgment or the power of the American electorate.”

And he later repeats a version of that. It’s ingrained into him.

It’s all in the “so.” The “so” inescapably indicates that Peter Strzok believes that he, personally, is America. But this is not the Patriotism of which he thinks he is the definition. Instead, this is, for him, about his inability to do wrong. This, my friends, is as cynical as it gets. It’s a licence to kill. It’s a licence to betray one’s country as doing so could not possibly be considered betrayal by him: he IS America.

There are plenty of false patriots who say: “I love America and I’m the most patriotic person ever and I embody all that America is.” No. That doesn’t work.

It needs to be added instantaneously that there is an ever present possibility that we can fall short, we are able to betray. It is this honesty and humility which keeps one sharp, frosty, and, indeed, able to see ever so easily how it is that this or that person is at the verge of or has already betrayed America and is a danger.

Anyone who embodies the “so” principle of Peter Strzok cannot be trusted.

Do the analogy. The person who, in the spiritual life says to himself that he is doing just fine and is strong because he hasn’t killed anyone in a long time or ever and that makes him all good is a fraud. The person who by the grace of God is in humble thanksgiving before the Lord gets it, knowing that he could fall at any time into whatever lack. Holiness is about the Lord creating us as His friends: “I call you friends.” The trust is not in ourselves but in Jesus. Jesus I trust in you.

Leave a comment

Filed under Intelligence Community, Law enforcement, Patriotism, Politics

It’s Police Week: I’m bleeding out

1 Comment

Filed under Law enforcement

Update: Removed? Anti-terrorism worship center security training: Get off YOUR OWN back end

Update: After merely eight people clicked on this post, it was trashed. I didn’t do it. Who did? Why? I’ll put it back up every time. Original post follows:

img_20190502_175658~28056155269464836694..jpg

What with church / synagogue attacks coming along fast and furious, I thought it might be a good idea to instigate a push for more security by all believers. After Mass Thursday I dropped by to have a chat firstly with the Sheriff of Graham County, requesting ongoing involvement not only with presentations to security teams of the various churches (itself an encouragement for all churches to rustle up security teams if they don’t already have them), but also to have someone be a training and range officer say once a month or every six weeks for those on security teams who are voluntarily armed. Our insurance, for instance, does not permit mandated armed security, only volunteers. All that got an enthusiastic response from the Sheriff, who told me that, in fact, just some hours before, a Powerpoint presentation was sent out at State level (North Carolina) to all county Sheriffs that they might use as a template to tweak for local presentations to the ministers and their security teams. He’s enthusiastic to do something with this, and, beyond that, to take up the suggestion for ongoing guided range time. He agreed that without continuous practice, no one is going to be frosty and edgy enough to be able to do the necessary in stopping the threat of an active shooter.

It’s true that a bunch of ministers went down to Georgia from WNC for a presentation quite a while back, but as one significant LEO commented afterward, that presentation was worth no more than being preparation for a clean up operation after all the slaughtering was done. In other words, the security learned was just enough to get everyone killed so that the crime scene wouldn’t be disturbed. A bit cynical, perhaps, but honest. And if we want to save lives, we have to be honest. Kudos to him for that honesty.

After heading to a nursing home / rehab in another county, I went to another Sheriffs Office to push for the same program. Believe me, no one in law enforcement is saying to just leave it to the professionals. They know that every split second of inaction in a house of worship means another person dead or wounded, you know, when help is minutes or longer away.

  • Are YOU part of a security team in your parish, your synagogue, and yes, your mosque (think of New Zealand)?
  • Do you even have a security team?
  • Not everyone has to be armed to be on a security team. Remember Hacksaw Ridge? Do you have people who are trained up in first aid, familiar with defibrillators, tourniquets and such? There can be those who simply help others (1) to get out (flight), or (2) get down under the pews (hide, giving clear access to those with stop-the-threat capabilities), or… (3) resist (fight) in whatever way.

If your Sheriffs Office isn’t pushing programs for all the ministers and their security teams, then you do something. And you absolutely can do something. Need some materials and direction? Behold:

DHS Active Shooter Preparedness Program for Churches

1 Comment

Filed under Law enforcement, Terrorism

SRI LANKA, an Easter Octave later

sri lanka easter terror 2

Looks like just a bit of confusion, like “someone did something” above. So, let’s move in media res and get a better idea. You can’t fix something unless you know what it is.

sri lanka easter terror 3

Not good enough. Let’s make this more personal. Jesus, just now risen from the dead, having been ripped to shreds Himself, blood everywhere, walks in the midst, the blood of His followers all over Him, witnessing to their belief in life eternal. As the Master, so the disciple.

sri lanka easter terror

  • “Today, you will be with me in paradise,” He says.
  • “The death of His faithful ones is precious in the eyes of the Lord.” (Psalm 116:15)

As of 4/27/2019 there are at least 310 killed and 469 wounded. More die and are injured as raids take place and “collateral incidents” occur. Always increasing numbers of terrorists are arrested or killed, depending on circumstances. Innocents can unfortunately be in the way as terrorist cowards hide behind women and children.

ISIS has claimed responsibility, having sucked in the local Islamicist terrorist group, National Thowheed Jamath.

  • But almost no one will say that they are Islamicist terrorists or ISIS. They are just “some people who did something.”
  • But almost no one will say the word “Catholic” about so very many of the victims, innocent, including women and children, and yes, also men.

All the spooky groups were telling the crowd in Sri Lanka 17 days before it happened. But just as Sri Lanka has traitors in it’s government, so do we. No decision maker knew.

It’s personal to me because these are other members of the Body of Christ. That’s as personal as it gets.

But, just to say, I also have priest friends in Sri Lanka with whom I lived in Rome at various colleges for years of studies.

I’ve even had an interview about the liturgy with the Cardinal Archbishop, his Eminence Albert Malcolm Ranjith Patabendige Don. He says he’s been told by the local Muslims that this wasn’t about anything Islamicist. “He says he’s been told…” Clever way of saying that. He says he has zero concern for the rebuilding of churches. He’s concerned about rebuilding lives. Good for him. Blessings upon them all.

I hope the perps convert and are forgiven. I hope the victims, if alive, can forgive. It will do them an eternity of good. We must pray for that: Hail Mary

Having said all that, even on this Divine Mercy Sunday, my sentiment is also summed up by the Chinese University student at the time of the Boston Marathon Bombing Dun “Danny” Meng when he escaped and was interviewed by Police Officer Tommy Saunders. It was the last thing Dun said to Tommy: “Get those *************!” This isn’t a vengeance thing over against someone who has repented. No. The bombers were on their way to New York City to do up some more bombing, more killing, more terrorism. They weren’t going to stop until the were stopped. So, yeah: “Get those *************!”

Having said all that, none of that is inconsistent with this being Divine Mercy Sunday.

  • Jesus still calls us to be witnesses to His forgiveness should anyone want it.
  • Jesus still calls us to be witnesses unto death, giving all in Him.
  • Jesus still calls us to to pray that He have mercy on us and on the whole world. 

And to those cynics who condemn religion because God permitted such a thing to happen, look again. He took our place, the innocent for the guilty, so that He might have the right in His own justice to have mercy on us.

pieta

And… and… He’s risen from the dead. And He intends to have us rise from the dead for life eternal. Thank you, Jesus.

2 Comments

Filed under Intelligence Community, Law enforcement, Military, Terrorism

Face of a coward wife killer

unnamed (1)4886805301531542351..jpg

Brutal eyes… After killing his wife with a gun — What a coward! — he ran across the state of North Carolina to within a few miles of the hermitage and crashed his car and took off into the forest. A massive manhunt was conducted. Needlessly. You see, cowards end up doing not-smart things. They kind of go together, not smart and coward. This guy ran into what is effectively the back yard woods of the Sheriff of Transylvania County, not a deputy, the actual Sheriff. The Sheriff just walked up to him and arrested him.

To women: If your man is beating you up, just leave. Just do it: run. It only gets worse. Take the kids and run. Cowards who are violent will kill. You will die. Your kids will die. Just leave.

1 Comment

Filed under Law enforcement

Patriots Day مترجم Islamicists bomb Marathon. Inspirational: Boston Strong

I put this up again. Lest we forget.

I note that this is one of those obvious copyright violations that YouTube has not taken down. There are reasons for this. This version has Arabic subtitles throughout. And while this might be seen as a “microaggression” by the powers that be, some sort of accusation against Islam, this presentation is clearly meant as an encouragement to peace. I rarely watch movies and have only seen a few minutes of this. If you’ve seen it, can you give us a review or comment one way or the other?

There’s a depiction of a woman getting interrogated until the interrogator realizes that any appeal to mercy or truth or goodness or kindness will never have any effect on someone who madly actually believes in sadistic bloodthirsty “Allah”.

5 Comments

Filed under Intelligence Community, Law enforcement, Terrorism

St Patrick’s Cathedral NYC: gas and lighters (and starter fluid just in case)

There were people inside. The gas guy, 37 years old with a Spanish name (that means nothing, btw), even spilled gas even while speaking with the security guard, who alerts counterterrorism in a manner that tells a stunning story about preparedness. Really, really impressive.

The guy’s story about just wanting to cut through the cathedral as a short cut to his car that was out of gas was immediately fact checked and found to be untruthful. Actually, he took full gas containers from inside his vehicle and then tried to enter the Cathedral.

Here’s a picture of what a see something say something situation looks like, this guy’s four gallons of gas and two bottles of lighter fluid and two lighters, you know, just in case:

gas lighter fluid lighters st patrick cathedral new york

You can’t accidentally spill gas out of those kinds of containers. I have exactly the same kind. You would have had to have had the caps so loose that they would just barely be on. No one does that.

It reminds me of a suspicious crowd coming to the rectory looking for gas money. I asked to see their car. They obliged. I asked that the car be turned on. They obliged, thinking that doing all this would get them money. They said they only needed to go forty miles, so, say, three gallons round trip for that vehicle. The needle on the gas tank level indicator went right up to full to the brim. I pointed that out and only then did their faces fall, knowing that they had been had.

The guy with the gas spoken about in the video above is detained and is assisting law enforcement with an investigation. I’m sure he’s just as successful as the crowd who came to the rectory. ;-)

Meanwhile:

notre dame france fire cross pieta

We DO NOT know much about either Notre Dame or the guy at Saint Pat’s. It’s early days.

I’m not drawing any analogy. I’m not drawing any conclusions. I’m not saying anything about purposes, motivations, accidents, whatever. I’m just saying that I’m reminded of another cross at ground zero not far from Saint Pat’s:

9 11 september 11 2001 cross

4 Comments

Filed under Law enforcement, Terrorism

Day Off and the Chrism Mass: Show of Force Prevention

img_20190416_091416~23409485296186539941..jpg

It’s Holy Week. Busiest days ever for a priest. Apologies to those sending questions etc.

Tuesday saw well over 400 miles clocked on Sassy the Subaru Forester, going from Andrews to the Chrism Mass at the Cathedral in Charlotte. The priests renewed their promises at Mass, the Sacred Chrism and the Oils of Catechumens and of the Infirm were blessed. There was a meal for the priests afterward. Artwork and best wishes by the children of the Cathedral were at all the places for the priests. This one was at my place:

img_20190417_085924~21796119206031763119..jpg

Of course, vocations are from Jesus!

img_20190417_085924~36282671864333269891..jpg

Everything about the day was enjoyable, well, except for something rather unexpected, rather out of the ordinary show of force with armed security, which is always done with the motivation of prevention. The security guy, in full uniform and a heavily decked out duty belt followed the bishop and his two deacons for the procession in and then out. So, I guess, this was more of a bodyguard thing.

What I say here is NOT a criticism, not in the least. I don’t know the circumstances. I’m guessing that if there was a credible and imminent threat, either the Mass would have been cancelled or there would have been support from “normal” law enforcement, with a couple of squad cars out front, etc. Perhaps there were some other undercover guys as at, for instance, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in New York.

The Bishop’s homily was rather abbreviated. And then, also out of character, he only appeared for perhaps one minute at the meal afterward to do the blessing. Again, I don’t know the circumstances.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

The policy of the diocese, surely to appease insurance companies, is that there can be no officially mandated armed presence for church services on any campus of the diocese. Let’s stare at that:

“No officially mandated armed presence…”

In other words, volunteers can volunteer, and it’s up to the priest to assess a volunteer’s viability on any number of levels and in all sorts of ways, but nothing that the priest says can make anything with weapons that which is expected of anyone for any reason ever. Fine. In the end, the policy is a non-policy. It just facilitates attorneys protecting whoever.

I’m guessing that this security guy at the Chrism Mass was told where he was to be and even that he was to be uniformed, but that any weapons were totally his option.

I had a good chat with him ranging from his provenance (that was interesting), a particular “group” to which he belongs (that was interesting).

During the hundreds of miles long trip there was plenty of time to mull things, that is, about this and a number of other issues, always enjoyable speeding by the mountain scenery.

But I wanted more time to mull things over. The Day Off suggested the option of gun-slinging. A detour was made to the neighbors to the hermitage. As usual, some FBI and FAM tactical pistol courses were accomplished.

I should volunteer to be a kind of security secretary to the Bishop, you know, with some optional security options optionally being put into play, optionally, of course, but surely in a more low-key manner. But for now, just to say, in support:

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

After the tactical pistol courses – which afford time for prayer for the bishops and priests during target set-up and replacement – it was then time for discussion with the neighbors to the hermitage. The topic above went on for hours. It is quite a bit to take in.

We discussed undercover as opposed to open show of force. Even at Saint Peter’s in Rome, the top operator guys are dressed in tuxedos so as to be more low key.

We ended by praying for the security of the Bishop, and that the Lord continues to give him the grace and strength he needs each day (to quote the card pictured above). Our Father… Hail Mary… Glory be…

To repeat: we don’t know the circumstances of the preventative show of force, and this is no criticism. Far from it. The whole “ounce” “pound” thing is very wise. Perhaps this is a paradigm for the diocese in hopes of saving lives amidst so many attacks on churches.

Yes, there is a picture of a glorious cross pictured at the top of this post in that card made by a child. “Out of the mouths of babes” and all that… And, yes, Our Lord did say, “As the Master, so the disciple.” Yes.

But defense of the innocent is a good thing. I’m sure there will be debate…

4 Comments

Filed under Day Off, Guns, Law enforcement, Priesthood, Terrorism

I’M BLEEDING OUT lyrics analysis

You know the Law Enforcement Tribute above dedicated to our finest who place themselves in danger and lay down their lives for our safety. I put it up top of the blog with some frequency. It happens all the time. The song has become a bit of a meme, with the subjects being from the Military or Law Enforcement or the Fire Department…

But what if we were to apply the lyrics to Jesus?

I’m guessing this is not at all in any way whatsoever what the authors intended.

But let’s see what happens… Amazing…

Jesus crucified passion of the christ

I’m bleeding out
If the last thing that I do
Is to bring you down [from our pride]
I’ll bleed out for you [standing in our place, the Innocent for the guilty]
So I bear my skin [and get it ripped off with the scourging]
And I count my sins [His sins… are our sins, the punishment for which, death, He takes on so as to have the right in His own justice to forgive us. “Father, forgive them!”]
And I close my eyes
And I take it in
And I’m bleeding out
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
When the day has come [The “Day of the Lord”]
But I’ve lost my way around [The “Way” has lost His way: the irony points to redemption. Just how many times did our Lord fall while carrying His Cross, that is, our cross, on the way to Calvary. Have you done the Stations of the Cross during this Lent?]
And the seasons stop and hide beneath the ground [Indeed. All of time is drawn into that one “Hour” when our Lord draws all to Himself, so that we might be buried with Him, so as then, in His Triumph over death, over our sin, to rise from the dead to live forever.]
When the sky turns gray [There was, in fact, an eclipse at this time]
And everything is screaming [With all hell broken out on Calvary, literally, the chaos would be, is indescribable.] 
I will reach inside
Just to find my heart is beating [Wow. And Jesus will put Thomas’ hand into His own side so that Thomas might touch the very Heart of God, still beating, risen from the dead, all out of Love for us. “My Lord and my God” said Thomas, no longer doubting, but believing.]
You tell me to hold on
Oh you tell me to hold on [People will surely condemn me for “re-writing” the Lord’s prayer, but what it actually says about the battle on Calvary not with some generic evil but over against The Evil One, is that we are to ask to be delivered, saved from the clutches of Satan (who would have been “our father” instead of our Heavenly Father if we are without the grace of Our Heavenly Father). We are asking quite literally in the Lord’s prayer that Jesus not throw us into the battle (the trial, the “temptation”) alone, but rather that He carry us into the battle, He being our Warrior, our Soldier, only Jesus. And that’s why, dear friends, the Mass was always said, also by the priest, in some places still today, facing Jesus, not “facing the people”. It is Jesus who carries us all into the Sacrifice of the Mass with Himself.]
But innocence is gone
And what was right is wrong [And then we blame Jesus for the hell, blaspheming, saying that it’s all His fault that all hell has broken out, all His fault that we get sick and die and seem to face Satan alone. But, no, it’s not that way. He continues to carry us, trying to open our eyes to see not just the battle, not just Satan, but rather Him, Jesus, rescuing us from Satan. We’re so self-centered. “Woe is me!” we cry. We should instead be in humble thanksgiving as Jesus carries us into the battle. Be not afraid! Jesus is the Victor.]
‘Cause I’m bleeding out
If the last thing that I do
Is to bring you down [from our pride]
I’ll bleed out for you
So I bear my skin
And I count my sins
And I close my eyes
And I take it in
And I’m bleeding out
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
When the hour is nigh [“The Hour” – the hour of Mary’s intercession as Jesus explained at the Wedding of Cana, drawing an analogy with His own marriage with the Church, giving Himself totally to the Church at the Last Supper with wedding vows fulfilled on Calvary with His bleeding out for us: This is my body given for you in sacrifice, my blood poured out for you in sacrifice…]
And hopelessness is sinking in [Yes, hopeless that His own Mother would be spared witnessing His being tortured to death. This would have hit Him hard in the agony of the garden. This is what He would try to avoid if possible, the hurt He knew His Mother would go through. “Father, Thy will, not mine be done.”]
And the wolves all cry
To feel they’re not worth hollering [Wow. Those words required lots of previous suffering of all kinds to come out like that. Wow. Good for the author of these particular words. Wow. In our sense of worthlessness, we cry about it, and then we strike out.]

When your eyes are red [The Shroud of Turin seems to indicated that the massive thorns from the Crown of Thorns went through His forehead and into His eyes…]
And emptiness is all you know [“My God! My God! Why have you abandoned me?!” Now, go read the rest of Psalm 22 to know what that’s all about. Totally awesome giving love for us in filial trust of His ever listening Heavenly Father.]
With the darkness fed [Satan had full rights over us since we obeyed Satan in our original sin, Adam’s sin, rather than God. Jesus didn’t owe Satan anything as Jesus usurped Satan’s rights over us when He Himself took on the punishment we deserve for sin, which is death. Jesus was fulfilling His own righteousness, with mercy founded on justice, His own justice, He standing in our place, the Innocent for the guilty. However, with this, Satan is “fed,” that is, muted, as now Satan can’t complain. Jesus did it for us.]
I will be your scarecrow [Saint Paul speaks of being a fool for Christ’s sake. Jesus makes it seem like He is the criminal for our sake, the One from whom we turn our eyes. But He brings us around. He’s very patient with us.]
You tell me to hold on
Oh you tell me to hold on
But innocence is gone
And what was right is wrong
‘Cause I’m bleeding out
If the last thing that I do
Is to bring you down
I’ll bleed out for you
So I bear my skin
And I count my sins
And I close my eyes
And I take it in
And I’m bleeding out
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
I’m bleeding out for you, for you
I’m bleeding out for you
‘Cause I’m bleeding out
If the last thing that I do
Is to bring you down
I’ll bleed out for you
So I bear my skin
And I count my sins
And I close my eyes
And I take it in
And I’m bleeding out
I’m bleeding out for you, for you


By Joshua Francis Mosser, Alexander Junior Grant, Benjamin Arthur McKee, Daniel Coulter Reynolds, Daniel Wayne Sermon. Bleeding Out lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group [N.B. I edited out “said” since I couldn’t hear it actually sung, at all, in any of the verses.]

2 Comments

Filed under Law enforcement, Officer Down!, Song analysis, Spiritual life

Officer Down Bleeding Out again, because this happens *every day*

I put this up because it’s inspiring to me, especially the first seconds especially second 0.31 bringing the guy back to life. Note that the LEO at 2.35 lives.

Leave a comment

Filed under Law enforcement, Officer Down!

Last Call Police: This is integrity. This is what touches my heart and soul

5 Comments

Filed under Law enforcement, Officer Down!

FBI Pistol Instructor re-qualification course: first time for this priest

img_20190205_104122~2521436620753262177..jpg

You can’t practice what I’m guessing is the FBI Firearms Instructor Pistol re-qualification course at an indoor range what with all the running and jumping around, so it’s away to the great outdoors where one appreciates the beauty of God’s creation. And that’s all part of it, btw, and all the more for those who are in deadly situations every day. The integrity of knowing how to be safe with some tools of self-defense is consistent with the integrity of walking in God’s presence.

The hermitage gun range is stretched up a super-steep pathway – at about 3,000 ft up, close to heaven, if you will – with the only kind-of-flat place being the starting firing line (used in this case for the first stage only), the rest of the path/course being as steep as 38º. But I won’t allow myself extra time for the parts where one is supposed to run, in this case climb, even with my middle-aged-ness kicking in. Real situations don’t allow for extra time. I’m told that shooting up-hill is more difficult. Good.

Here’s a downloadable graphic presenting in my own shorthand what I’m guessing is the briefest of re-qualification courses for FBI Firearms Instructors. This is only part of what they do, excluding the drive-by shooting scenarios, the “kill-house” scenarios, the pop-up discern bad-guy from good-guy exercises, etc. You can copy the graphic of this most basic part of the course below and fit two of them on one 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of paper. The timings are very generous.

FBI Tactical Pistol Instructor Course

If there are any mistakes with that, let me know. It’s a point per bullet. But I don’t know if a “hit” refers only to entirely inside the line of the QIT inside bottle or the whole “body.”

I only briefly researched this once like a year ago. I tried to verify it just now. There’s a lot of BS on-line. For instance, the entire first stage above is, from my research, to be done continuously in a total of 75 seconds or less. One guy put up four minutes for the first stage. That can’t be right. My times – which I thought were really slow, even for a first attempt, and not having practiced for a good while – came in at about 60 seconds. I mean, the entire course shouldn’t take but two minutes shooting time max, which, as I say, is already very generous. Of course, if you’re not changing out the target, you’ll still have to stop to count hits and mark out already fired shots after each stage.

Btw, I use not-foreseen-for-this-course Glock 19 Gen 4 that was refurbished by Glock down in Smyna, GA. With that, I use the absolutely forbidden ultra-evil never-to-be-used Blackhawk Serpa (it has a dangerous trigger-finger unlock for the holster). It’s just that it’s safe for everyday carry as it’s almost impossible for a bad-guy to take the gun. Any suggestions are welcome for an alternative OWB holster that’s similarly close to the body (which excludes pretty much all LEO holsters).

Previously, I’ve tried my own makeshift running courses – like running by a small target [paper plate] some seven yards away while shooting with whatever hand – but this is the first time I’ve done an “official” tactical pistol course involving running, or going from prone to a knee to standing, back to a knee, amid combat reloads and after that more running. The extra activity is done for the sake of getting the adrenaline going, and to make for a more realistic exercise. Great.

But perhaps I should combine the courses I’ve been doing, like the pre-2001 Federal Air Marshal TPC (the timings for which are hilarious for me, as they are two and three times quicker than the FBI instructor course), and what I know of the SEALs TPC (even quicker), as well as a few exercises of my own, like shooting a suspended wobbly stake in half. Even direct hits with target ammo won’t snap it. It’s gotta be hit many times in the same place:

It’s not a sin to have some innocent fun that is also useful in real life. As I say, I’ve already had to draw up on a carjacker who had just robbed everyone at a rest stop and wanted a get away car. I had a police officer in desperate straits as a passenger. I was bringing him to the hospital for major surgery for an almost fully ripped-off arm at the shoulder. He was already helpless besides that as he was still suffering from a broken back because of one of the traffic stops he had made in the past. This cop in my passenger seat desperately said that this was a car-jacking. What was I supposed to do, let him be kidnapped, become a hostage (because he’s a cop) and perhaps be murdered? I support our LEOs! Surely saving the life of a cop and otherwise protecting a cop from grave injury isn’t an unseemly activity for a priest, is it?

Thankfully, at that very nanosecond, another LEO screeched to a stop in front of the robber, now would-be carjacker, kidnapper, hostage-taker guy. Then eight more cruisers joined that cop within seconds, and how many more from the other direction I don’t know as the first cop let us go as other cops joined in the apprehension.

If I write such things, it’s to demonstrate that priests are people too. It’s good for priests to know that they are human beings. And good for other people to know that priests are human beings. Just because of my background, this is my way of having fun. But it comes with a price – enjoyable – of keeping sharp, a bit edgy, well-practiced. I was happy for a day off. And, yes, lots of prayers were said too.

Leave a comment

Filed under Day Off, Guns, Law enforcement, Priesthood, Vocations

Copping an attitude with “dirtbags”: We’re keeping track of all y’all.

police lives matter

Joe Gamaldi, president of the Houston Police Officers Union, speaks reality after five officers were wounded, two critically, and for one of them, the third time he has been shot.

“Now I want to speak on behalf of the 5,200 brave men and women who work in the Houston Police Department and the other 800,000 police officers who are working these streets every single day, are putting their lives on the line. We are sick and tired of having targets on our back. We are sick and tired of having dirtbags trying to take our lives when all we’re trying to do is protect this community and protect our families. Enough is enough.

“And for the ones who are out there spreading the rhetoric that police officers are the enemy, well just know we’ve all got your number now and we’re going to be keeping track of all y’all and we’re going to be making sure we’re going to be holding you accountable every time you stir the pot on our police officers.”

Why is it that some mayors of some cities go out of their way to make sure that peace officers have no way to protect themselves, and have policies that would forbid them from constraining individuals appropriately when the safety of whoever is at risk?

But calling murderous violent criminals “dirtbags”? I like it!

Calling criminals like ISIS “animals” just doesn’t cut it. Saint John of the Cross says that sin makes us to be less than animals as we don’t do what we should even while animals do what they should do. So, it’s not fair to insult animals by calling criminals “animals.”

Just call ciminals “dirtbags.” Great!

Are they redeemed by our Lord. Sure. Are they saved? Dunno about that. Whatever about the state of their souls, what they present on the outside = “dirtbags.” Should we go out of our way according to our circumstances to introduce people to Jesus. Sure. If we have those circumstances, our Lord expects it. Jesus loved us while we were yet sinners, while yet criminals, while yet… wait for it… dirtbags. Our Lord is very good and kind.

Having said that, I also hope our LEOs have all the tools that they need for certain circumstances:

fargopolicedepartment

Leave a comment

Filed under Law enforcement, Officer Down!

Fingerprints and nobody: “Everything about him is wrong.” Spy vs… himself.

I’ve seen almost no movies in my life. I have seen the above clip on YouTube. I applaud the quick-thinking question of The Equalizer: “‘We’ who?” and again “‘We’ who?”

And while the Russian spy playing a detective later states to his partner in crime about Robert McCall – “Everything about him is wrong” – that is the very thing that McCall is thinking about the Russian spy guy: “Everything about him is wrong.”

Here’s the deal: Sometimes there are things people say – or don’t say – that simply cannot be categorized as being “misspoken” or which are simply not intentionally not fulsome.

I’ve met people like this, perhaps more than has been the experience of others, perhaps because of my own weird background and perhaps because I come across as being a simpleton (not that I’m not) and naive (not that I’m not) and so am not worth the effort to try a little more (not that I am).

Some few people I’ve met right around the world have said things that scream, unbeknownst to them, that they were role-playing. Even worse, some few among them didn’t care that they were found out in that role-playing, and simply continued like it was all good.

Perhaps an example is in order. For instance, in one of my far-flung assignments that have taken me right around the world a number of times, I ran across a guy who said that the reason he never had a police check run on himself – virtue signalling guy that he was – was that when he himself was administering police checks on other people he didn’t have available to himself a fingerprint scanner for himself, “you know, one of those gadgety box things” he added. So, even though he could run police checks on others he couldn’t have that done for himself, but, you know, only because they didn’t have a fingerprint scanner gadgety box thing, as if having your prints run and having a police check done on your name are the same things, one dependent on the other. Um. No.

fingerprint scanner

If you didn’t follow the logic of that, don’t feel badly. There are so many things wrong with that assertion that it’s difficult to know where to begin. That’s not the way things are done on so very many levels regarding common sense and policy and – in that particular far flung place – local, state and federal law. And that’s true with just about everything that guy said. It’s like, that was the worst role-playing ever to have been witnessed upon the face of the earth, ever… Ehhh…vur

Just in case it isn’t obvious, let’s draw out a just a few points:

  • You don’t administer your own fingerprint scanning, a conflict of interest thing.
  • You don’t run your own fingerprints, a conflict of interest thing.
  • If you were trained in to do up fingerprints and/or run them, that would mean that you were actually law enforcement, but if that were true, you would have had to have had some kind of serious, thorough law enforcement check, including fingerprints run everywhere with all agencies, and so, in that case, why would you fake it that you never had your prints run and never had a police check?
  • Just because you’re not running fingerprints for anyone doesn’t mean you can’t permit your name to be investigated with a police check.

the doughnut cheltenham

Whether this guy was law enforcement – he did like Doughnuts (see above) – or was faking it, or even faking like it could be legitimately faked, is messed up in any case. Why bother with mind games? That guy claimed to have connections with a certain intel crowd in his country, as if, it seems to me, that would give him a pass, you know, like the virtue-signalling Snowden or the virtue-signalling Strzok, but I think that was just cover for his belonging to another agency between whom, as we say, there is no love lost.

pine gap surveillance australia

Whatever the case, he didn’t get anywhere with anything. What was scary – if anything can be scary – was his utter disregard for coming up with a credible story. He just didn’t care, because, surely, he’ll just bully his way through to a particular occupation and it would all be good. I wasn’t going to let that happen inasmuch as little me could do anything to make sure it didn’t happen. It was all too Camp Swampy:

you know what this is

Of course, nothing is at is seems.

another view

Leave a comment

Filed under Intelligence Community, Law enforcement

Matt Pearce Story – How to listen

Here in far Western North Carolina, we’ve had some difficulties with Law Enforcement. Right now, in my county, there are several State Bureau of Investigation investigations going on, and a multitude of Federal Bureau of Investigation investigations. It comes down to just a few individuals being involved, of course. As with ever sector of society, it’s just a few bad eggs that stink up everything. It’s not everyone. Far from it. I say all that for the criminal element among us who think that accusation is proof of crime. I’m sure you can make the analogy.

Anyway, when listening to this story, watching it, don’t so much be thinking that Matt is a hero as if what he has done is unattainable to the rest of the great unwashed, somehow beyond everyone else, a freak occurrence. No. Doing what we’re supposed to do in whatever circumstances we are in is just what we are supposed to do. Meeting up with the likes of Matt is an occasion to be inspired to do just that.

1 Comment

Filed under Law enforcement

What makes mass shooters tick?

Upshot, as it were: Help the police do their job in this dangerous world.

There were warning signs about the shooter: Ignored, of course. The Canadians want to think that everyone is nice all the time. How dare we ever even insinuate that someone might not be nice. Everyone is entitled to be thought of as being nice! And then tantrums and hissy fits ensue. Just like in these USA these days.

Image result for hissy fit gif

The upshot of that ignorance: train up not only to see the warning signs but to act on them. It’s called situational awareness. But it’s not as easy as all that. Quick and easy solutions are usually the fast road to death and grieving. Sure, arm the police. Sure, pay attention to the guy who says he wants to kill people. Easy. Do that. But those aren’t the only things.

For instance, what about the Stephen Paddock or whatever his name is, who shot up Las Vegas? To this day “no one knows the motive.” Really? Cowards! How does one get people to face reality? See my rant on the cowardice of some of our intel community:

Stephen Paddock’s motivation and our motivation in not finding his motivation

Humility. Humility. Humility. Start with oneself. Sure, we all have unrepeatable circumstances by which – right now anyway – none of us would do those terrible things. But that’s an occasion for us to congratulate ourselves to the point where we don’t know that by so doing we give ourselves a licence to do those very things. Ah, the irony of it. People are afraid of irony. It’s too hard hitting. It’s offensive. It’s to be dismissed as literary trickery. And because of that arrogance that we are all better than the rest of men, people will die either because we won’t catch out those who are murderous or we ourselves will fall into that violence. Impossible, you say? Just following “orders” you say? Where have we heard that before by people who have congratulated themselves? It happens more quickly than you think.

Solution (in case you missed it): Look at the link about Stephen Paddock above.

No, really! Click.

hilaire bellocAnd if you fail to understand irony. Think of Jesus on the Cross, standing in our place, the Innocent for guilty, He bearing the weight of our evil, becoming like a mirror of our evil. And now, with that in mind, read over this frightening bit on irony from the great Hilaire Belloc:

“To the young, the pure, and the ingenuous, irony must always appear to have a quality of something evil, and so it has, for […] it is a sword to wound. It is so directly the product or reflex of evil that, though it can never be used – nay, can hardly exist – save in the chastisement of evil, yet irony always carries with it some reflections of the bad spirit against which it was directed. […] It suggests most powerfully the evil against which it is directed, and those innocent of evil shun so terrible an instrument. […] The mere truth is vivid with ironical power […] when the mere utterance of a plain truth labouriously concealed by hypocrisy, denied by contemporary falsehood, and forgotten in the moral lethargy of the populace, takes upon itself an ironical quality more powerful than any elaboration of special ironies could have taken in the past. […] No man possessed of irony and using it has lived happily; nor has any man possessing it and using it died without having done great good to his fellows and secured a singular advantage to his own soul.”

[Hilaire Belloc, “On Irony” (pages 124-127; Penguin books 1325. Selected Essays (2/6), edited by J.B. Morton; Harmondsworth – Baltimore – Mitcham 1958).]

Leave a comment

Filed under Guns, Law enforcement

Shooting my neighbor’s dog: wrong guy

img_20181228_160247150_burst011~23183558294850694815..jpg

Basset Hound

When there’s illegal gunfire in the neighborhood, Shadow-dog is quick to turn his head and look in the direction of whatever it is, a pistol, a shotgun, a rifle. I’m sure he’s, like, “What’s that and is it coming this direction?” As it is, my neighbor’s dog was shot yesterday, I’m guessing point blank, Sunday morning, when people were in church. Two other neighbors (one a retired minister and one a Vet and Firefighter) want to move away. Andrews and this neighborhood in particular is getting to be way too violent.

No one heard anything because this time it was all subsonic, a pellet gun of some sort. Pretty powerful though. The pellet struck his shoulder bones and ricocheted so as to destroy surrounding muscles and tendons. That’s what a .22 “real” bullet might do. That’s why I say that it was probably point blank. I hate that. The neighbor’s dog is a basset hound, not this one. I’ll have to take a picture of the real Frankie-dog when he gets out of surgery. I’m guessing the guy who shot Frankie-dog is going to pay that bill.

I think I might know the guy who did it. I’m thinking the guy who did it didn’t grow up around here. I don’t think the the guy who did it knows whose dog he shot. You just don’t shoot someone’s dog in Western North Carolina. No. The only one who would do that is a tender snowflake from an entitlement big city. Sorry, I’m generalizing. sigh…

Let’s just take a look at what happened when a Navy SEAL’s dog was shot, this time while he was home. This is harrowing. Kudos to law enforcement for helping him out:

Here’s the deal: people who can shoot animals just to do it can also easily just go ahead and kill human beings. Those are the stats. Yep.

But maybe this is my fault. There’s a weirdness with the mail delivery and unless you know it, it’s a little difficult to know whose address you’re really at, mine or the neighbor’s. I’d hate to think that someone wanted to do in Laudie-dog or Shadow-dog but instead got Frankie-dog. At any rate, our reaction is the same no matter whose dog.

Update: here he is…

This would have been a kill shot if it had been any more powerful.

1 Comment

Filed under Dogs, Guns, Law enforcement