Tag Archives: Mayo Clinic

Keto for EX-Jabba the Hut: NIH vs Mayo Clinic BMI

Some BMI parameters are more accurate than others.

I’ve been using the model from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. It’s no work to do the calculation. It only asks height and weight, NOT age, or whether male or female, or other relevant data like muscle mass. Here’s that one:

Various branches of the military have models which are surely much more accurate but – for me – are not user friendly. If you’re more into it than me, go for other military models. But realize that the different branches are also very different one from the other. Stunning, really.

Because of my experience at the Mayo Clinic, I trust them. They have a user friendly interface for their BMI calculator. It asks just a few bits of information, such as sex, age, height, weight, and waist circumference, giving instructions as to how to go about that measurement. They don’t make you buy calipers, etc. Some months ago I noticed that the result varied from NIH about 0.5 on the BMI scale. But now it’s the same. The big difference regards the advice.

This is the advice that came up for me:

Your Results
Your BMI is
24.9

Normal with unhealthy waist. [[ At 25.0 there’s a huge reprimand given to the user. I much prefer what’s here for 24.9… ]]

You’re on the right track! Being at a healthy weight reduces your risk of serious health conditions, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

However [[N.B.]], your waist size [[ 36″ for the belt, but 40″ just above the waist]] suggests that you have excess abdominal fat, which puts you at greater risk of developing obesity-related conditions, such as type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. [[ Mayo said I had a perfect heart, but that was ten years ago… ]] Talk to your doctor about what you can do to lower your risk. [[ My primary care physician is away until June 13 last time I checked some months ago. ]]

In the meantime, follow these steps to prevent weight gain:

Embrace healthy eating by choosing a variety of nutrient-rich foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy sources of protein such as fish or beans and smaller amounts of healthy energy-dense foods, such as olive oil, nuts, and dried fruits. [[ So, I guess they don’t like the Keto diet! But I am looking for a percentage calculator that is not Keto so that I can make the switch of metabolism back to carbs and protein instead of having the emphasis on fats. Anyone know an easy one to use? ]]

Increase your activity level. [[ They got that right. How did they know? ]] Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity. [[ I’ll go for the moderate. That comes out to > 20 minutes a day. I don’t know how to do that, as I can’t really run or even walk for multiple days in a row. I’m a bit crippley in a number of ways in the legs and feet and I hate anything to do with anything like a bicycle. Just ain’t gonna happen. Any suggestions? Someone mentioned a rowing machine. Anyone know a good one that is solid? I tend to break stuff… ]] Do strength training exercises for all major muscle groups at least two times a week. Aim to do a single set of each exercise, using a weight or resistance level that can tire your muscles after about 12 to 15 repetitions. [[ So, when I get around to this, there are sets of sit-ups, push-ups, barbels, and ankle-weighted quadriceps reps. ]]

Set action goals focused on specific healthy activities, such as improving muscle tone through strength training or starting a daily food and activity diary. [[ I’m game. ]]

No longer Jabba the Hut, I prefer being a guard donkey. This is a donkey’s style of weight lifting, with reps referring to violent shaking of the mortal threat.

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