Tag Archives: Yaron Svoray

Neo-Nazi Hunting: Patience wins.

The yellow Star of David with “Jude” written inside on a bloody, sweaty, burned scrap of camp-uniform is reminiscent of the Shoah, the Holocaust.

As long time readers know, I have reasons, on every level, for being in solidarity with the Jews.

As long time readers know, I not infrequently feature that very Star above on this blog, as I did about five weeks ago once again. I carry such things in my heart, always.

The Star has 12 sides, obviously referring to the 12 Tribes of Israel. The Star has six points to it, with the number six referring to that which is yet incomplete, which only comes with seven. Israel was looking for the Messiah yet to come. He is symbolized with the center-piece. The Star is to be found everywhere on the synagogue in Capernaum where Jesus preached, while He preached there. This is one which Jesus would have seen Himself that is carved into the rock from which the synagogue was made:

I myself do various things with that inside bit:

Sassy the Subaru sports a certain flag with a slight change to the center of the Star, a simple Cross.

Even more, I would call the Star of David instead the Star of the Son of David, with the Star being the living Ark of the Covenant, the Immaculate Mother of the Messiah. We recall the Flos Carmeli:

While the Star of David is very ancient, it is also prominent in more recent presentations of the Qabbalah, which simply refers to a received tradition. Some Jews would know much of this in the mid-20th century, in some places more than others. Some would know merely that it exists but never got into it in the least.

While you may like or dislike Kabbalistic literature (de-)contextualized from its wildly-varied lived experience in wildly varied places and times and cultures and degrees of knowledge about the same, or not, what you might know if you have the least smidgeon of sincerity in you is that not every Jew knows everything there is to know about anything Kabbalistic and therefore is not responsible as a representative of the same (prescinding from anyone’s assent to whatever myriad points about it[!]).

And then I recently got a message from someone who saw that yellow “Jude” Star of David above on my blog as people might on the open ended internet. Surprise was expressed that a Catholic priest would put up just such a Star in that particular context so as to be in solidarity with the Jews. After all, it was said, it is prominent in the Kabbalistic literature, as if that was a conclusion.

I responded that this yellow Star with “Jude” written in it was an obvious reference to the Holocaust, and that… But I was cut off. The person said that the Star belongs to the Jews. They made it up. They can own it. They all deserve everything that they get.

And that last bit was present tense with the direct context being the Shoah, the Holocaust.

I know who this person is. He knows I have Jewish heritage. This attack has been going on for years, but it was never so clear as it was just now. I’m very patient with this sort of thing. Always waiting for more clarity. Often where’s there’s smoke, there’s fire. Well, well. Things are very clear right now. And the fires are the ovens. For this guy, all Jews should be put to death because Kabbalistic literature is to be found somewhere in the world.

I am reminded of a distressing documentary of a Neo-Nazi hunter. At one point he says he thought he was going to drop dead as his heart was literally pounding out of his chest what with the entirety of the horror of the holocaust in front of him. Yep.

This is more common than one might think. I can multiply examples. I should collaborate with the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

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Filed under Jewish-Catholic dialogue, Shoah

JBS: Yaron Svoray & Simon Wiesenthal [Jesus sweat great drops of blood]

Mr Yaron Svoray, thank you. Having said that, a warning: Yaron doesn’t give details to this audience. Thank God. But what he says about Neo-Nazis today put me into what I wouldn’t rightly call a deep depression so much as an overwhelmingly clearer awareness of the evil that we can and do find anywhere around us and with the most unsuspecting people. This story is NOT for the innocent and naive. It contains things you can’t unhear. My recommendation: Don’t subject yourself to it. I put it here as a proof of the point made. Having said that, again, thank you, Mr Svoray.

Mr Yaron Svoray mentions that he thought he was going to simply die, not being able any longer to stand in the presence of such terrible evil, the pressure being too much. Just listening to his story I understood exactly the feeling he had. I know that feeling. I’ve experienced it. It’s not a depression thing, as people might describe as one’s insides being gripped by a darkness which drags one down. No. This is instead like one’s soul is trying to leave one’s body so as to escape the evil… the evil… The pressure of the evil, the feeling of inescapability from the evil, is just too much, as if one is going to get a heart attack. One feels like one is going to drop to the ground, dead. Don’t listen to Yaron, lest you die. It took me days to somehow be extracted from that feeling that one’s soul is trying to escape the evil, so close, I guess, to having a heart attack, enough for this to be noticed by others. Uggh.

Having said that, I profusely thank Mr Svoray for his presentation. He, a Jewish guy, having worked with the great Jewish educator and Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal (31 December 1908 – 20 September 2005), has, in this way, led me to the wounds of Jesus. In seeing those wounds, like Thomas the Apostle, one realizes that there is nothing that should surprise us. Jesus saw it all, already. But we are weak. Like Yaron, who knew all the horrors of the holocaust, and who was about to die just for being in the presence of evil… like Yaron, we are just so weak to behold any more evil in the present moment. What do we really know about evil? And if we do not have the wherewithal to withstand the evil, what, therefore, do we really know of God’s love, God who, in beholding all the evil, nevertheless so loved the world that He… ? Again, Yaron, thank you.

Having said all that, Jesus, in His human nature, also had this experience in the agony in the garden of Gethsemane, when He sweat great drops of blood. All of hell and hell’s evil and all the sin of all had come upon Him. Uggh! As the “Doctors of Calvary” tell us, in their examination of the Gospels and the Shroud of Turin, Jesus did indeed have a massive heart attack breaking the pericardium. Jesus died more of this heart attack before 24 hours would pass than He did from the torture and crucifixion. Remember that Pilate was surprised that Jesus had already died, the process of the effects of the crucifixion usually taking a few days. Jesus faced all the evil. Uggh.

The question then before us is this: Do we become cynical in the face of any and every bit of evil that we see, or do we allow ourselves to have our eyes opened however painfully right throughout our lives, and therefore do we allow ourselves to help others who are being subjected to the evil?

It is in seeing how far Jesus had to reach to get us, into our darkness, into the evil, knowing what it would cost Him to show us His goodness and kindness and truth… It is in seeing just how far Jesus had to reach to get us – and He coming among us anyway – that we can turn from the darkness to thanksgiving to God for Jesus coming among us.

For those of you who choose to watch that video… uggh… Just know I’ve warned you.

Having said all that, it is listening to this story a certain statement of a certain person who told me that he wants to “kill Jews” comes to mind.

I’ve never been one to say “Never again!” because it is too easy to think that in saying that one has already done enough. If you see something say something. But just like the tragedy at the school shooting in Florida, no one is listening. Too bad, that.

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Filed under Intelligence Community, Jesus, Jewish-Catholic dialogue, Shoah