Catheads n Soppins n Sanctuary Renovation

  • 6:00 am text: You got ten minutes to get to church.
  • 6:01 am text: 11
  • 6:02 am text: k

After plotting how to continue with the sanctuary renovation, specifically with security of the tabernacle, after noting how great the altar progress and Communion rail progress is going (though one rail broke but that’ll maybe be taken care of by Saturday morning), we raced off to Grandpa Charlie’s for some breakfast.

Catheads n soppins are bisquits and pepper gravy. Great omelet as well. The Mud Coffee was spectacular. [I’ve done my USCCB alternative penance for Fridays first thing this morning.] Here’s some pics of the sanctuary renovation:

We’re taking it slow. There’s much more to be done for both. The altar, for instance, needs some crosses and a sepulcher for relics, plus the marble pillars to either side (we have those) and some kind of art work for the middle, and needs the consecration rites with the Sacred Chrism. SLOWLY. We wanna do it right.

We will surely have appropriate pictures for the diocesan newspaper (they’ve been chomping at the bit) when we do the consecration. That’ll take time. SLOWLY.

By the way, about the Catheads n Soppins above. Here’s the deal: plotting out progress on such projects is an ongoing process necessitating lots of sit-downs, and can’t be put in architectural drawings forced onto unknown situations regarding the structure of the building, especially considering limited funds in the tiniest parish in North America. It has to be done detail by detail over months and months, and months and months…

There are those with unlimited resources who can force restructuring of entire buildings and don’t understand this SLOWLY-method at all. They are the kind who buy a new vehicle when a hubcap pops off. They can afford it, and they don’t care. But when you have shoestring budgets, this is how you do things.

I remember a church project somewhere in the world that we got done for 10,000 thousand dollars when the recommendations by the those with unlimited resources wanted to spend 600,000.00 bucks. Yep. And we did it ten times better. But the way which involves the parishioners as a parish family – always the way to go – involves Catheads and Soppins. I love that. Parishes are about Jesus and parishioners, right?

Anyway, I’m looking forward to more Catheads n Soppins. :-)

2 Comments

Filed under Liturgy

2 responses to “Catheads n Soppins n Sanctuary Renovation

  1. Paul Maliborski

    Carheads n Sopping, really should be titled. Father George, “Drunken Sailor Edition “.

    So we had to discuss our next steps in deciding what and how to proceed with the renovation. That’s when Father George mentioned that he had not had coffee yet. So, I say let’s go for breakfast.

    We sat down at this cute little restaurant here in Andrews, NC, and the waitress ask us if we’d like some coffee. Sure we both say, like some parched fish.

    She ask if we would like some, “mud coffde”?
    What’s that? You might ask. Well it’s high octane coffee.

    So us two niave breakfast loving characters said Surely let’s try it.

    Now, coffee rarely alters my state of mind, this stuff elevated my energy level to the next level. For Father George, it was just the beginning of a new life cycle. He was on fire and couldn’t stop talking. Then we met a couple from Minnesota. His home base. The reminiscing begins. I had to drag him out of the restaurant, with my claw hammer.

    Mass is at noon today, wish I could be there for the homily. It’s gonna be a great one.

  2. meshugunah

    Catheads ‘n Soppins – what a terribly unattractive name for a delicious breakfast as per your description…Only in America! And I had a Grandpop who doted on Steak and Kidney Pie and Pigs’ Trotters, so no room to criticize…

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