Tag Archives: Vulgate

Belarmine’s six rules for critica textus. “Palimpsests of Kryptos!” she yelped. “Ain’t a hooker,” whispered my Shadow.

analyst

[[[ This is just one of those boring for-the-record posts that make no sense except to one or two readers within electronic range of the bird’s eye above. The rules presented below are a favor to “the hooker” who’s “not a hooker,” but rather an analyst, a recruiter, a watcher, a baiter, a betrayer, analogously “a hooker”, and a very close associate of my “Shadow.” If I were to be terribly cynical, I would just say, “It’s all too easy” and then just leave it go. But that doesn’t do anyone any good. Maybe these rules will help her figure herself out in the proper way, with the Holy Spirit. Right now she’s reading herself into what she’s doing. But that only brings her to herself, and not even that. ]]]

Bellarmine

These are the six rules of Saint Robert Cardinal Bellarmine, S.J., regarding textual critical redaction of the ancient manuscripts of Sacred Scripture many decades after the fourth session of the Council of Trent. The rules are utterly unscientific and self-serving: check out the words in red. Nota bene: the “regia” is the ancient Greek manuscript he and the commission of Cardinals used as a working document for this project, all at the behest of the Supreme Pontiff. The manuscripts he used from the Vatican’s Apostolic Library are duly noted in the registers. Yet, he had more manuscripts available to him than this. Research has become difficult for reasons I cannot share… yet… The politics are… heart-stopping…

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1. Quando plura manuscripta antiqua convenient cum vulgata latina: mutetur regia.

1. When many ancient manuscripts agree with the Latin Vulgate: the ‘regia’ is to be changed.

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2. Quando omnia manuscripta contra vulgata et contra regia inter se conveniunt: mutetur regia, sed in notationibus ratio reddatur.

2. When all manuscripts against the Vulgate and the ‘regia’ themselves agree: the ‘regia’ is to be changed, but the reason is given in the notations.

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3. Quando vulgata non refragatur, et maior pars manusciptorum contraria est regiae; mutetur regia, et reddatur ratio in notationibus.

3. When the Vulgate does not oppose, and a major part of the manuscripts are against the ‘regia’, the ‘regia’ is to be changed, and the reason is given in the notations.

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4. Quando manuscriptum unum vel plura concordant cum vulgata, id annotetur in variis lectionibus.

4. When one manuscript or many agree with the Vulgate, it is to be noted with the variant readings.

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5. Annotationes fiant ad finem uniuscuiusque capitis.

5. Annotations may be made at the end of each of the chapters.

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6. Quando clare apparet, aliqua verba esse addita ex alio evangelista, eorum non habetur ratio: ut v. g. Marci 8, Saturati sunt omnes, illud omnes translatum est ex Matth. 15 in graeco.

6. When it appears clear that other words have been added from another Evangelist, they will not be reckoned: so, e.g., Mark 8, Saturati sunt omnes, that omnes was transferred from Matthew 15 in Greek.

/// These were first published in the most bloody days of World War II in an obscure though official journal and within days of Divino afflante Spiritu, perhaps in mockery of Father Andreas, Bellarmine’s secretary. But such arrogance was without understanding. At any rate, these rules could just as easily have been written by Erasmus or Luther, and were written by them in their spirit. Meanwhile, I had sent in a request to my close friend, the Cardinal Prefect of the Apostolic Library and Archivist of the Holy Roman Church, describing the resulting work. He sent the logistical prefect of the Library at the time on a wild goose chase that would result in a letter describing the results of the search. The ambiguity of that letter was masterful. The search was called off for incredibly specious reasons. I didn’t bring it up for some six months, but then, up in Saint John’s Tower of the Secretariat of State, I did ask his Eminence about this with a rather leading question which provoked a response that, all that time later, was instantly filled with anger yet perfected pleasantness, bitterness yet perfected cold-as-death intense calm. He had been waiting on edge all this time. His answer, given after a hesitation of, say, five full seconds (and that’s not easy) with every word calculated as in an impossible chess game (just nine words), was ferociously ambiguous, using multiple negatives and the passive voice, making the intent unmistakably clear. The tone was that of a challenge, as in “You’ll not succeed (though you just might)” [those not being the words he used]. I have to bide my time on this one. Pretty much everyone is dead who would stop the project. And… and… I know where to look.

At any rate, Bellarmine rejected this relativism of his “rules” at the end of his life and was beatified also because of this rejection of the error of his ways. He had been prostituting himself for decades as a man of consensus with the new Protestants, a kind of self-appointed embodiment of anti-Counter-Reformation. But then, thankfully, he went into full Counter-Reformation mode. It seems that his doing that was the straw that broke the camel’s back. I’m not sure of the exact day, but it seems that the day of Bellarmine’s recanting is the day the genocidal thirty years war was to begin raging throughout Europe doing in thirty to fifty percent of the population of Europe. Bellarmine’s influence on the Church and on politics cannot possibly be underestimated.

“That’s stupid, Father Byers: religion has nothing to do with the real world,” say the manipulators of our own day. I have to wonder if analysts today are so humble was Bellarmine as to figure out that they are not as clever as they think they are. I doubt it. They can make the same mistake as Bellarmine, wasting their time, even if they faithfully follow the Treasure Map. They forget the quasi part of quasi per manus, thus rejecting the One who could draw them into the truth (see: A Most Glorious Day), thus prostituting themselves to the praise of others, thinking they are clever by clicking mouse buttons day and night, continuously, scouring, creating an imaginative story line, scouring this web site and that, clicking on dozens and dozens (rarely even some hundreds) of posts morning, noon and night, clicking and clicking, searching and searching (clever searches though) not only my site, but those of my friends. It ain’t gonna help. Reality is more complex and simple, more profound and simple, than any scouring is going to realize. **.***.***.**9. It’s all too easy, too easy to bait, to send her on my own wild goose chases. Actually, the activity from that one computer is a bit creepy.

I shouldn’t be so cynical…     I’ll pray.

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Filed under Adulterous woman, Ecumenism, Father Byers Autobiography, Intelligence Community, Interreligious dialogue, Jewish-Catholic dialogue, Terrorism

IT’S APRIL 8 – A MOST GLORIOUS DAY

COUNCIL OF TRENT

HEY! It’s the 471st anniversary of Sacrosancta, the first decree of the fourth session of the most sacred and ecumenical Council of Trent in 1546. This is my most favorite of all magisterial interventions. Be awed by the syntax in Latin. Be awed by the breadth, the heights, the profundity, the glory emanating from this decree. Let yourself be wrapped up it’s reverence before the Most Holy Spirit. Let yourself be brought to your knees. Unfortunately, rebel Martin Luther, ex-Catholic priest, would die just months before this was published, though I have to think that he was kept up to date on the ruminations for the first drafts, not easy if one is in bad health.

First the Latin…

Sacrosancta oecumenica et generalis Tridentina synodus, in Spiritu sancto legitime congregata, praesidentibus in ea eisdem tribus apostolicae sedis legatis, hoc sibi perpetuo ante oculos proponens, ut sublatis erroribus puritas ipsa evangelii in ecclesia conservetur quod promissum ante per prophetas in scripturis sanctis dominus noster Iesus Christus Dei Filius proprio ore primum promulgavit, deinde per suos apostolos tamquam fontem omnis et salutaris veritatis et morum disciplinae omni creaturae praedicari iussit; perspiciensque, hanc veritatem et disciplinam contineri in libris scriptis et sine scripto traditionibus, quae ab ipsius Christi ore ab apostolis acceptae, aut ab ipsis apostolis Spiritu sancto dictante quasi per manus traditae ad nos usque pervenerunt orthodoxorum patrum exempla secuta, omnes libros tam veteris quam novi testamenti, cum utriusque unus Deus sit auctor, nec non traditiones ipsas, tum ad fidem, tum ad mores pertinentes, tamquam vel oretenus a Christo, vel a Spiritu sancto dictatas et continua successione in ecclesia catholica conservatas, pari pietatis affectu ac reverentia suscipit et veneratur. Sacrorum vero Librorum indicem huic decreto adscribendum censuit, ne cui dubitatio suboriri possit, quinam sint, qui ab ipsa Synodo suscipiuntur. Sunt vero infrascripti. Testamenti Veteris: Quinque Moysis, id est Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numeri, Deuteronomium; Iosue, Iudicum, Ruth, quattuor Regum, duo Paralipomenon, Esdrae primus et secundus, qui dicitur Nehemias, Tobias, Iudith, Esther, Iob, Psalterium Davidicum centum quinquaginta psalmorum, Parabolae, Ecclesiastes, Canticum Canticorum, Sapientia, Ecclesiasticus, Isaias, Ieremias cum Baruch, Ezechiel, Daniel, duodecim prophetae minores, id est: Osea, Ioel, Amos, Abdias, Ionas, Michaeas, Nahum, Habacuc, Sophonias, Aggaeus, Zacharias, Malachias; duo Maccabaeorum, primus et secundus. Testamenti Novi: Quattuor Evangelia, secundum Matthaeum, Marcum, Lucam, Ioannem; Actus Apostolorum a Luca Evangelista conscripti; quattuordecim epistulae Pauli Apostoli: ad Romanos, duae ad Corinthios, ad Galatas, ad Ephesios, ad Philippenses, ad Colossenses, duae ad Thessalonicenses, duae ad Timotheum, ad Titum, ad Philemonem, ad Hebraeos; Petri Apostoli duae; Ioannis Apostoli tres; Iacobi Apostoli una; Iudae Apostoli una et Apocalypsis Ioannis Apostoli. Si quis autem libros ipsos integros cum omnibus suis partibus, prout in ecclesia catholica legi consueverunt et in veteri vulgata latina editione habentur, pro sacris et canonicis non susceperit, et traditiones praedictas sciens et prudens contempserit: anathema sit.

Now my own slavish translation… NOT the usual translation!

The Most Sacred Ecumenical and General Tridentine Synod, convened legitimately in the Holy Spirit, with the three Legates of the Apostolic See presiding over it, is itself proposing for perpetuity in plain sight, so that, having cast down errors, the very purity of the Gospels may be conserved within the Church… [The purity itself of the Gospel…] which, before promised through the prophets in the holy Scriptures, our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, first promulgated with His own mouth, and then commanded to be preached by His Apostles to every creature, as the fountain of all, both saving truth, and moral discipline; and seeing clearly that this truth and discipline are contained in the written books, and the unwritten Traditions which, received by the Apostles from the mouth of Christ himself, or from the Apostles themselves, the Holy Spirit dictating, have come down onto us, transmitted almost as if by hand… [The Synod] following the examples of the orthodox Fathers, receives and venerates with an equal affection of piety, and reverence, all the books both of the Old and of the New Testament — seeing that one God is the author of both — as also the said Traditions, as well those appertaining to faith as to morals, as having been dictated, either by Christ’s own word of mouth, or by the Holy Spirit, and preserved in the Catholic Church by a continuous succession. [At this point, the list of books is provided. See the Latin.] If anyone, however, will not receive as sacred and canonical these same integral books with all of their parts, as they have been accustomed to be read in the Catholic Church and as are had in the Old Latin Vulgate edition, and will hold in contempt the aforementioned Traditions knowingly and with considered judgment: let him be anathema.

Note “almost as if by hand” since this is all about the Holy Spirit!

This is THE Counter-Reformation assertion by the Sacred Magisterium of the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church against the heretics who reduce revelation to theology and inspiration to feelings, the dark arrogance having them rewrite and remove things from the Sacred Scriptures so as to assert merely themselves. This decree is CATHOLIC!

On a personal note, I was ordained a deacon on this day in the Twelve Apostles Basilica in Rome. Also, this decree became the center piece of the beginnings of a doctoral thesis (the first chapter being 256 pages), the story of which needs to be told one day, reaching as it does into the very heart of the intrigue of ecclesiastical politics and stirring the pot so much that… well, I’ll leave that for another day. Just note that this decree is still THE engine driving any true ecumenical dialogue, that is, which brings unity in truth and charity those who sincerely follow Jesus.

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Use the “Vulgate” or the inspired text?

matthew

While the Vulgate has “a” correct sense, which should not be not considered, one is to strive to get the fullest sense from the inspired text, whatever language that is, whether Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Phoenician. That‘s the teaching of the Church. We Catholics don’t consider the Vulgate to be inspired, as many non-Catholics think somehow that the King James Version is inspired. Some people complain that this is archeologism, a kind of heresy in their eyes even for the inspired Biblical text, but that’s when such complainers become heretics. The inspired text is part and parcel of the revelation, which is unchanging, complete. Yes, let’s see what Jerome did for textual criticism, for he was brilliant. But he himself wasn’t too concerned about the fullest sense, bowing instead to just wanting to keep the status quo inasmuch as he could, even against his better judgment. But that’s Jerome. Then there’s Augustine, who attacks the persnicketiness of language trolls. But then there’s the teaching of the Church about the beauty of what’s inspired. Let’s take everything we can from the Fathers and the Vulgate, but let’s also follow after the Holy Spirit, as those very Fathers of the Church would have us do. They would have wanted to know back in the day what we know about language today.

By the way, the Nova Vulgata is absolutely not the Vulgate!

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Update: 03 The Father Byers Kryptos: Rules for the Treasure Map (Solution found!)

sixtus v

Question: Before moving on in this series to the intrigue, mayhem, violence, death, exhilaration, public and private revelation from on high, can anyone, say, in a sentence or two, summarize what the treasure of the treasure map is, and how it is that we are supposed to get to that treasure with the treasure map?

Solution found! Scroll down the comments. I refer to the contribution of elizdelphi. After that, the discussion gets quite refined. Great! But elizdelphi nailed it.

Following up on the first posts of this series (see the category The Father Byers Kryptos), these are my Continue reading

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