Category Archives: Free exercise of religion

Woman jailed for baptizing her girl

judge

I don’t know all the circumstances. It seems she and her hubby agreed to have the child raised Catholic. The judge didn’t like what he called criminal contempt. Something’s not right in this story. I wish I knew more.

I wish I knew more because I could be the next pastor of that parish in this diocese of Charlotte, North Carolina. Maybe not, but maybe so. But it is in my diocese.

I will say this: I do know of a decision by the North Carolina Supreme Court regarding penalties imposed by North Carolina courts over against religious persons, a decision which in its own text rejected the free exercise of religion as expressed and defended by the Constitution and Supreme Court of these United States. In other words, the North Carolina Judiciary – in letting that law stand – basically doesn’t give a damn about the free exercise of religion and is itself in contempt of the citizenry of these United States.

5 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion

Pope Francis, faithful priests loyal to the papacy, and… and… China

torture in china religion

This lady complained about the persecution of Falun Gong. She died of mistreatment. And so it is for other believers, including Christians, including Catholics.

It’s inevitable, you know, the question that comes from faithful young priests:

Why is it that liberal non-believing atheist priests who smash down the faithful in every possible way are always favored by both liberal and perhaps especially noticeably by conservative, devout, believing bishops, and this specifically over-against faithful priests who are just quietly trying their best to follow the doctrine and morality of the Church, the proper way to offer Holy Mass and the other sacraments, who are just being good and kind in their parishes? Why is that? It’s always that way, or at least it seems that it is always that way, since it is just such a betrayal of all that one would otherwise expect in reason and justice and integrity and honesty. So, why is it that faithfulness is not rewarded with at least being left alone to practice the faith, to be good to others?

And this is not just true in parishes, it is also true in the Holy See, in the appointment of Bishops and Cardinals. On and on.

And this is not just true with individuals, but also with entire countries and regions of countries. For instance, with China. I cannot think of any other part of the world where the laity and clergy and bishops have suffered more to remain loyal to the Holy Father only apparently to have been smashed down by him. It almost seems he wants to have the laity and priests and bishops loyal to him be disappeared or put into labor or re-education camps, to be tortured and put to death. It almost seems that he just doesn’t give a damn. Does he really think he will get concessions? Does he really think that this will not embolden the government religion police to crush believers all the more, using this move of Pope Francis as psychological torture. I mean, imagine: “The Pope doesn’t want your loyalty. He despises your suffering and the suffering of all those with you and who went before you. He spits on you.”

But that should make one pause and ask why, and ask not with cynicism, but with a view to getting an answer. To be cynical is deadly. Surely that is not what is wanted by anyone. I am weak. If I were in China and was seemingly betrayed by the Holy Father like this, I must admit that I would be wide open to slipping into this deadly cynicism, wide open to slipping straight into hell. Even though that would not make sense. We are all so fragile.

The answer to the question of my own priest friends about why faithful priests who are loyal are smacked down in favor of filthy-liberal non-believers is two-fold:

  • It is thought that Jesus will take care of those who are faithful. But this is tempting God, is it not? We have an obligation to love and respect others with God’s love and God’s truth and God’s goodness and God’s kindness.
  • It is thought that concessions will win friends and influence people, so that people will simply suffer less, because you know, that’s what it’s all about. But this seems only effectively to reject what little light is in the darkest of peripheries, and it all descends only farther into the depths of hell.

So, can we think about all this in any way that is positive? Well, what if the actor, in this case, Pope Francis, only has concern for less torture and sincerely believes that concessions will make for less torture? I mean, I would not want to be tortured. That would indeed be horrible. Horrible. No, really… horrible. Pope Francis might even think that this “less torture” benefit will solve both points above. Could be.

We pray for Pope Francis. We pray for China.

7 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion, Politics, Pope Francis

GOP’s US-FISC FISA Warrant Memo

I’ll be watching closely for many reasons as the Memo may unwittingly answer some questions I have about possibilities regarding a number of operations that involve the first amendment, specifically the free exercise of religion. ;-)

1 Comment

Filed under Free exercise of religion, Politics

Thanksgiving’s Squanto: essential story

squanto thanksgiving

The True Story of Thanksgiving: Squanto, the Pilgrims and the Pope,” tells the story of Squanto whose odyssey left him alienated and homeless. But without him, our Thanksgiving could not have taken place.

Leave a comment

Filed under Free exercise of religion

“The Guy” sent this: Catholic Patriotic Faith in the Public Square

Perhaps someone knows who “The Guy” is. He’s someone whose example I strive to follow.

2 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion, Patriotism, Uncategorized

Trump’s Exec Order “Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty” Great!

UPDATE: I think I understood the intent of this order correctly, so that, for instance, even though language was removed at the last second regarding the free exercise of religion of businesses, it seems to me that this was done in order that another separate executive order might be prepared regarding that particular issue. Indeed, within seconds it was stated that work on this aspect of the question of the free exercise of religion is now going to be thoroughly pursued.

===========================

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, in order to guide the executive branch in formulating and implementing policies with implications for the religious liberty of persons and organizations in America, and to further compliance with the Constitution and with applicable statutes and Presidential Directives, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. It shall be the policy of the executive branch to vigorously enforce Federal law’s robust protections for religious freedom. The Founders envisioned a Nation in which religious voices and views were integral to a vibrant public square [thus, we’re talking not about mere freedom of worship in whatever church building, but, as the Constitution says, the free exercise of religion, that is, in the public square. Forget the untoward speech of John F Kennedy in Texas when he promised to follow the heresy of Americanism, whereby morality bows to the democratic will], and in which religious people and institutions were free to practice their faith without fear of discrimination or retaliation by the Federal Government [Right. The purpose of the Constitution on this matter is not that the government, for, of and by the people, is to be free of people who exercise their religion in the public square, but that the people who exercise their religion in the public square are to be free on government persecution]. For that reason, the United States Constitution enshrines and protects the fundamental right to religious liberty as Americans’ first freedom. Federal law protects the freedom of Americans and their organizations to exercise religion and participate fully in civic life without undue interference by the Federal Government. The executive branch will honor and enforce those protections. [“undue” – That’s an important word, qualified by the remaining paragraphs. “undue” ensures that, for instance, a “Cultural Center” (Mosque) on the West side of Columbus, Ohio, might well, if necessary, be investigated for terroristic activities.]

Sec. 2. Respecting Religious and Political Speech. All executive departments and agencies (agencies) shall, to the greatest extent practicable and to the extent permitted by law, respect and protect the freedom of persons and organizations to engage in religious and political speech. In particular, the Secretary of the Treasury shall ensure, to the extent permitted by law, that the Department of the Treasury does not take any adverse action against any individual, house of worship, or other religious organization on the basis that such individual or organization speaks or has spoken about moral or political issues from a religious perspective, where speech of similar character has, consistent with law, not ordinarily been treated as participation or intervention in a political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) a candidate for public office by the Department of the Treasury. [Thus, well encompassed in these parameters is a pro-life sermon speaking explicitly of details of political platforms of individual candidates, even mentioning that candidate by name and using direct citations, but speaking of the upshot of these in natural law and in view of Sacred Scripture, Sacred Tradition and the Sacred Magisterium of the Church. You can’t say, “Religously speaking you must vote for SOANDSO.” You can’t put up political signs saying “Vote for SOANDSO” on church property. However, in the negative, it would be just fine to say, “It would be a mortal sin to vote for SOANDSO in SUCHANDSUCH circumstances since this can very well be the case from a religious perspective depending on the circumstances.] As used in this section, the term “adverse action” means the imposition of any tax or tax penalty; the delay or denial of tax-exempt status; the disallowance of tax deductions for contributions made to entities exempted from taxation under section 501(c)(3) of title 26, United States Code; or any other action that makes unavailable or denies any tax deduction, exemption, credit, or benefit. [That’s great. Holy Souls Hermitage was, for instance, never audited by the IRS, though IRS servers would quite frequently be found in the visit logs. I had said a number of times that payment of any IRS fines for having published something drastically religious and political like “Be nice!” during the Obama administration era would likely only be able to be paid in chicken droppings.]

Sec. 3. Conscience Protections with Respect to Preventive-Care Mandate. [Contraception, abortifacients, abortion…] The Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Labor, and the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall consider issuing amended regulations, consistent with applicable law, to address conscience-based objections to the preventive-care mandate promulgated under section 300gg-13(a)(4) of title 42, United States Code. [If anyone is there from the previous administration, they will have to be removed, as this could drag on forever. But I’m guessing those people are dying of heart attacks this very day.]

Sec. 4. Religious Liberty Guidance. In order to guide all agencies in complying with relevant Federal law, the Attorney General shall, as appropriate, issue guidance interpreting religious liberty protections in Federal law. [This should be easier based on some unanimous Supreme Court decisions. Thus, religious schools don’t have to hire LGBTQ religious ed. teachers. Thus, Chick-fil-A and the Little Sisters of the Poor are free to carry on with getting great food to people and taking care of the sick and dying.] Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion, Politics

North Carolina Catholics challenge POTUS on free exercise of religion

bishop-peter-joseph-jugis-diocese-charlotte

February 4, 2017 — Religious freedom in America has suffered years of unprecedented erosion. The Executive Branch of the federal government can correct some of these issues. The President can restore the federal government’s respect for the religious freedom of individuals and organizations by signing an Executive Order that establishes a government-wide initiative to respect religious freedom. Elements of such an Order should include:

  • Relief from the mandate of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that forces the Little Sisters of the Poor and others to facilitate the provision of contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs and devices in their health plans.
  • Preservation of tax-exempt status for nonprofits that hold beliefs based on marriage, human sexuality, and the protection of human life at all stages.
  • The ability of religious organizations that partner with the federal government to act according to their beliefs regarding marriage, human sexuality, and the protection of human life at all stages.
  • A broad religious exemption to Executive Order 13672 so that faith-based organizations can continue to partner with the federal government to provide much-needed services here at home and abroad.
  • The ability of religiously affiliated child welfare providers to provide adoption, foster, or family support services for children in accordance with their religious beliefs.
  • Protection of accreditation for religious schools based on their beliefs.
  • Conscience protections regarding abortion in the individual health insurance market.
  • Any Executive Order should make it clear that religious freedom entails more than the freedom to worship but also includes the ability to act on one’s beliefs. It should also protect individuals and families who run closely-held businesses in accordance with their faith to the greatest extent possible.

Yours in Christ, The Most Reverend Peter J. Jugis – Bishop of Charlotte

The Reverend Monsignor Michael Shugrue – Administrator, Diocese of Raleigh

4 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion, Politics

USA follows Ireland: Zero Religious Freedom

father miguel pro cristero

Father Miguel Pro praying before execution.

It used to be that Ireland followed America. Now we’re following Ireland, filthy, anti-Catholic Ireland. It’s come to my attention that David French at the National Review has reported that:

A state court in Massachusetts has ruled that a Catholic preparatory school violated the state’s antidiscrimination law when it rescinded a job offer to a man because he was married to another man. Matthew Barrett had accepted a job as Food Service Director at the Fontbonne Academy, a Catholic girls school. On his employment forms, he listed his husband as his emergency contact — a move that led the school to rescind the job offer.

But here’s the hypocrisy of all this: At the moment, religious schools are exempt from paying directly into the Obama Abortion Superfund while paying insurance for their employees. To remain exempt, the school must hire almost exclusively Catholic personnel and teach almost exclusively Catholic students.

Now, if the court forces anti-Catholic personnel on the school, it will be said that the school cannot be exempt from paying directly (formal cooperation) into the Abortion Superfund.

This kind of blatant, public hypocrisy turning into open persecution is exactly what happened against the Jews (and I’m 100% Jewish) in Germany leading up to the holocaust, the Shoah. This is your government, people. When it happens, it happens very quickly. From one day to the next.

6 Comments

Filed under Free exercise of religion